§ 156.228  REMEDIAL PROCEDURES.
   (A)   Conditions that require remedial procedures.
      (1)   Remedial site reclamation and tree care procedures shall be implemented, when development activities have caused damage to either the tree or the tree's growing site, and that damage is repairable.
      (2)   If encroachment into tree protection zones is anticipated or has happened, the following practices shall be employed to improve survivability.
   (B)   Canopy pruning.
      (1)   The pruning of a tree in anticipation of construction damage may provide compensation for potential root loss and produce an invigorating response.
      (2)   A tree that has suffered root damage becomes stressed as that root system no longer provides sufficient water and nutrients for the existing crown.
         (a)   This stress becomes evident with the appearance of "staghorns" or deadwood within the tree's crown.
         (b)   Once a tree has had construction damage, it is advisable to delay pruning one to three years until the deadwood becomes evident. Pruning for deadwood removal is then recommended.
      (3)   The removal of live plant tissue from a construction-damaged tree can accelerate the tree's decline.
      (4)   Pruning of root-severed trees may reduce the possibility of windthrow.
      (5)   Trees that have not been affected by construction activities can be pruned for maintenance of the tree's health, appearance, and safety, utilizing acceptable arboricultural practices.
      (6)   Pruning specifications as provided in the latest version of ANSI A300 shall be used in all pruning cases.
      (7)   The pruning of specimen trees may be subject to Planning and Development approval.
      (8)   All cabling work and other structural support supplemental systems shall be installed in accordance with the latest edition of ANSI A300 American National Standard for Tree Care Operations - Trees, Brush, and Other Woody Plant Maintenance - Standard Practices on Support Systems and Cabling.
      (9)   Any lightning rod protection shall be installed in accordance with ANSI A300 American National Standard for Tree Care Operations - Trees, Brush and Other Woody Plant Maintenance - Standard Practices on Lightning Protection.
   (C)   Root pruning.  All roots outside of the protective barricade to be removed during the development shall be cleanly severed, and a two-inch layer of mulch shall be applied over the surface of exposed roots during development.
   (D)   Fertilization.
      (1)   Fertilizer applications will enhance the vigor of trees stressed by site disturbances, thereby promoting root development.
      (2)   Information regarding appropriate fertilizers and application rates may be obtained in the latest edition of ANSI A300 American National Standard for Tree Care Operations - Trees, Brush and Other Woody Plant Maintenance - Standard Practices on Fertilization.
   (E)   Soil aeration.
      (1)   A tree's ability for adequate root development, and ultimately its chances for survival, are improved with reclamation of the growing site.
      (2)   Wherever possible, the soil should be brought back to its natural grade.
         (a)   Unnecessary fill, compaction, erosion sedimentation, concrete washout, and construction debris should be removed.
         (b)   When machinery is required for site improvement, it is recommended that a "Bobcat" or similar lightweight, rubber-tired vehicle be used so as to minimize soil compaction.
      (3)   Compacted soil within the tree protection zone of trees should be aerated.
         (a)   A compressed air gun is used to cut narrow trenches in a spoke pattern away from the trunk, to a depth of eight to 12 inches or greater if the soil grade has been raised.
         (b)   Trenches should begin four to six feet from the trunk to avoid cutting any major support roots and should extend to the dripline.
         (c)   Trenches are then backfilled with topsoil or compost. The air exchange, nutrient, and water-holding capacities of soils can be improved with soil amendments. This is best accomplished by backfilling with mineral amendments such as perlite, vermiculite, isolite, and the like.
 
   (F)   Mulching.  A four- to six-inch layer of mulch material, such as pine straw, pine bark, or wood chips, spread within the tree protection zone of trees on construction sites is extremely beneficial.
(Ord. 00018, passed 4-11-00; Am. Ord. 00052, passed 9-12-00; Am Ord. 02024, passed 6-11-02; Am. Ord. 05003, passed 2-8-05; Am. Ord. 11008, passed 2-8-11; Am. Ord. 14047, passed 8-12-14; Am. Ord. 16085, passed 10-11-16; Am. Ord. 18076, passed 11-13-18)  Penalty, see § 156.231