§ 1412.06  REQUIRED CAPACITY OF HEATING EQUIPMENT.
   (a)   Except as provided in divisions (b) and (c) hereof, heating equipment and heating installations installed after the effective date of this section (Ord. 3230, passed December 26, 1956) in buildings or parts of buildings of Residential  Occupancy, Institutional Occupancy or Educational Occupancy shall be adequate to maintain an interior temperature of seventy degrees Fahrenheit in all parts of such buildings customarily used for human occupancy when the outdoor temperature is minus five degrees Fahrenheit and the wind velocity is fifteen miles per hour, without forcing the equipment or installation beyond its published rated capacity, thereby creating a fire or life hazard. The required design temperature of seventy degrees Fahrenheit shall not apply in spaces not customarily used for human occupancy, and lower design temperatures may be used for spaces such as enclosed service porches, heated garages and other similar spaces, when approved by the Superintendent of Inspection.
   (b)   When new heating installations are made in buildings of Residential Occupancy erected prior to the effective date of this section (Ord. 3230, passed December 26, 1956), and strict conformity with the provisions of divisions (a) and (e) hereof would result in undue hardship, the Superintendent shall approve installations which will not provide the prescribed interior temperature, provided such installations are made with the prior knowledge and written consent of the owner and no fire or life hazard is created thereby.
   (c)   The provisions of this section shall not be interpreted to require that existing heating installations or parts thereof shall be altered to conform to the provisions of division (a) hereof except when there is a change of occupancy resulting in a change of occupancy classification, and except that all newly-installed or replacement equipment shall have the capacities required by division (a) hereof.
   (d)   Where the capacity of a heating device, appliance, equipment or installation, or method of determination of the same is not established by this Part Fourteen - Building and Housing Code, or, in lieu thereof, by a specific standard listed in such Code, or defined or established by the Board of Building and Minimum Housing Standards and Appeals, or established by tests made by an approved testing laboratory, agency or organization, and accepted by the Board, the published recommendations, data or tables of the following organizations may be accepted by the Superintendent as defining accepted safe practice in determining such capacity:
      (1)   Heating, Piping and Air-Conditioning Contractors National Ass’n;
      (2)   Institute of Boiler and Radiator Manufacturers;
      (3)   Steel Boiler Institute;
      (4)   National Environmental Systems Contractors Ass’n;
      (5)   American Gas Ass’n;
      (6)   American Society of Mechanical Engineers; and
      (7)   American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers.
   (e)   Before a heating installation is made in any building of an occupancy listed in division (a) hereof, drawings, layouts and data shall be submitted to the Superintendent showing the proposed heating installation and indicating the capacities of the equipment to be installed. Except as provided in division (b) hereof, no permit shall be issued for any proposed installation in such a building unless the following conditions are met:
      (1)   The measurement of heat losses in accordance with the methods established in the Manual of the National Environmental Systems Contractors Ass’n, the Guide of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers or by any other recognized method shall constitute prima-facie evidence that such measurements have been computed properly.
      (2)   The net output of central heating devices to be installed shall be not less than the calculated heat loss of the building plus 10%, except that for buildings intermittently heated the net output shall be not less than the calculated heat loss of the building, plus 25%.
      (3)   Determination of the sizes of the supply and return systems shall be in accordance with the methods established in the Codes and Manuals of the National Environmental Systems Contractors Ass’n, The Guide of the American Society of Heating and Air-Conditioning Engineers or any other recognized method, and shall constitute prima-facie evidence that such sizes have been determined properly.
(Ord. 3230, passed 12-26-1956)