§ 155.09  SIGN STANDARDS: SIZE AND TYPE BY DISTRICTS.
   The following signs, with their specific sizes, are allowed in each district.
   (A)   Historic District.
      (1)   Residential.
         (a)   Single-family, attached dwelling unit. One dimensional surface sign is allowed for each unit, not to exceed five square feet in area, attached to the building or freestanding.
         (b)   Multiple-family dwellings. One dimensional surface sign, not to exceed five square feet in area, is allowed.
      (2)   Business: number of signs.
         (a)   Each commercial building shall be permitted either one monument sign on the property or one projecting sign at the street entrance of each commercial unit.
         (b)   Each commercial unit is allowed to have one dimensional surface sign.
         (c)   Each commercial unit is allowed one awning sign over the entrance and upper-story windows.
         (d)   Each unit/tenant is allowed to have one window sign.
         (e)   If the unit has frontage on two streets, a second sign is permitted and may be either a flat sign, a dimensional surface sign or a projecting sign.
         (f)   If a unit possesses a rear entrance or an additional entrance on a secondary frontage, the unit is allowed one awning sign and a dimensional surface sign or a projecting sign.
      (3)   Business: sign sizes.
         (a)   A flat sign may not be located higher than the bottom of the windowsills of the second floor, nor conceal other architectural features of the building, nor should it extend above or below the historic signboard if still in existence above the storefront. The sign area shall occupy only the center 70% of the facade on which it is located, and shall not extend within two feet of the edge of the wall.
         (b)   A secondary flat sign may be located on the sides of a building, but may not exceed dimensions of 10' by 16'.
         (c)   A dimensional surface sign may not project more than 12 inches from the wall, nor be located less than nine feet, and no higher than 15 feet, from the sidewalk. The sign shall not project higher than the bottom of the windowsills of the second floor, nor conceal other architectural features of the building, nor should it extend above or below the historic signboard if still in existence above the storefront. The sign area shall occupy only the center 70% of the commercial unit frontage, and shall not extend within two feet of the edge of the wall. The dimensional lettering may be affixed directly to the building or to a material that is then mounted to the building; in either case, the sign projection must be less than 12 inches.
         (d)   A projecting sign may not be more than 12 square feet in area, and no exterior dimension shall be more than four feet. The sign and mounting system shall not project more than seven feet from the building wall, and no portion of the sign shall be lower than nine feet above the sidewalk, and no more than 13 feet above grade (as “grade” is defined in § 156.003 of the Zoning Ordinance). The sign's mounting system shall not extend beyond the building's parapet, nor impede or destroy any architectural element or ornament on the building. Projecting signs are not restricted to a particular shape, allowing for creativity in sign design, such as an object or symbol for a type of business, or in the mounting system.
         (e)   The entire structure of a monument sign shall be inside the property line of the premises in which the business is conducted. The display area of the monument sign shall not exceed 32 square feet, and no part of its structure shall be more than six feet above the grade immediately below.
         (f)   Window signs shall be permanently affixed or painted and/or a similar treatment directly on the glass, suspended in the window, or back-supported and placed in the window. The sign shall not occupy more than 20% of the total window area. Temporary window signs are not to be exhibited more than 14 days, and may be shown in addition to those regularly displayed.
      (4)   Awnings and awning signs.
         (a)   General intent of awnings.  Traditionally awnings did not serve as a primary means of advertising. They were used for practical purposes, including protecting pedestrians from the weather, protecting items displayed in the window from sun damage, and conserving energy.
         (b)   General design of awnings. An awning may be placed above windows and doors and not cover more than one-third of the opening, and should not distract from the architecture of the building or the business inside. Awning(s) over first-story windows and doors should not extend above the first story. The number of awnings should be determined by the design of the building. A single storefront without divisions between windows will typically require one awning. On properties with divisions between windows and doors, multiple awnings should be used, each designed to fit one window. Awnings should mimic the shape of the opening, and should not extend across bays or beyond the opening.
         (c)   Clearance.  Awnings shall be at least 7.5 feet above the sidewalk.
         (d)   Valance. Awnings shall contain a valance. The valance is the only portion of the awning that may include a sign. The valance should not be fixed or rigid; it should be free hanging, but can be integrated as a separate component of the overall awning to reduce the cost of replacement or cleaning. The height of the valance shall be no less than ten inches and no greater than 12 inches.
         (e)   Projection. Awnings shall project no less than three feet from the building.
         (f)   Type and shape. Fixed or retractable awnings are permitted. Standard sloped/shed awnings, with either closed or open ends, are permitted. Boxed, curved and odd shapes, such as bull nose and bubble awnings, should not be used in the Historic District, unless there is evidence that historically this type of awning was used on the building.
         (g)   Signage.  All signage on the awning shall be located on the valance and shall not exceed eight inches in height, nor shall it occupy more than 70% of the valance length.
         (h)   Lettering.  Lettering may be painted, appliqued or silk-screened on the valance.
      (5)   Sidewalk signs.  Each business shall be allowed to have one sidewalk sign. The sign may only be displayed during business hours and must be removed at the close of the business day.
         (a)   Size.  The area of the sidewalk sign or object cannot exceed:
            1.   Four feet high, as measured from the sidewalk;
            2.   Two feet in width; and
            3.   Three feet in depth.
         (b)   Materials.  Material usage is limited to wood, fiberglass-coated wood, slate or any combination. A weight system to anchor the sign must be included in the design of the sign and be used at all times. Electricity may not be incorporated into the sign, nor any indirect or direct lighting. The Zoning Administrator may reject the permit for a sidewalk sign if it is not of an appropriate material that would withstand the elements and/or would cause harm to pedestrians or vehicles. Signs may also be rejected if the construction and lettering are not of professional quality.
         (c)   Appearance.  Lettering must be of a professional quality and consistent with the lettering examples identified in the Appendix to this chapter.
         (d)   Location.  The sign shall be placed so that a minimum of a five-foot, unobstructed pedestrian walkway is maintained at all times (not including the step-curb). A five-foot clear zone shall be maintained at corner locations of two sidewalks.
      (6)   Electronic message centers. Electronic message centers shall be prohibited in the Historic District.
      (7)   Illumination signs.  All signs in the Historic District must be lighted indirectly only by a shaded flood spotlight or a gooseneck lamp, with the exception of neon lighting. Neon lighting is allowed within the Historic District, provided that it is not used as a means of illumination to transmit light through the faces of signs, which is commonly referred to as backlighting, but rather is utilized in a form of externally exposed tubing as part of the external elements that make up a sign, itself, that is historically and architecturally appropriate. Halo-lit signs accenting individual letters or a logo are allowed if the lighting source is entirely hidden behind an opaque face.
      (8)   Illumination awnings.  Awning shall not be internally illuminated as an attention-getting devise. Illumination may occur from separate fixtures that light the top surface of the awning. Light fixture design and illumination patterns shall be complementary to the building's architectural design and materials.
      (9)   Colors. Earth tones and one primary color shall be used on signage and awnings in the Historic District, where feasible and in keeping with the character of the structure and surrounding area. This color combination is to highlight the unique usage of limestone in multiple commercial buildings. In order to promote legibility in signage, not more than three colors shall be used on any one sign, excluding white, black or gilding, and awning signs.
      (10)   Lettering. As the purpose of signage is to advertise a business to pedestrian and automotive traffic, the primary concern in choosing a font for lettering should be legibility and proper spacing. Within the Historic District, lettering should be similar in style to the examples in the Appendix.
      (11)   Materials allowed.  Unless otherwise noted, signs within the Historic District can only be constructed of aluminum, wood or fiberglass-coated wood, and should be attached to the building using fasteners appropriate to the sign. Awning signs should be constructed of a soft cloth, such as canvas, to allow movement. Shiny finishes are generally not appropriate unless consistent with the building architecture.
      (12)   Signs on designated historical structures. On designated historical structures, an additional sign of not more than five square feet display surface is allowed to be located anywhere on the exterior wall, or on a historical pediment above the cornice. Additional signs on historic structures signs larger than five square feet shall be allowed, when the Heritage and Architecture Commission determines that it is consistent with the historical character of the building, and issues a certificate of appropriateness for the sign.
   (B)   City residential (excluding the Historic District).
      (1)   Single-family, attached dwelling unit.  One dimensional surface sign is allowed for each unit, not to exceed five square feet in area, attached to the building or freestanding.
      (2)   Multiple-family dwellings. One dimensional surface sign, not to exceed five square feet in area, is allowed.
      (3)   For apartment complexes containing more than one apartment building, an additional sign, not to exceed five square feet in area, may be allowed for each building.
      (4)   The sign shall not be illuminated.
   (C)   City business areas (excluding Historic District).
      (1)   Number of signs.
         (a)   Each commercial unit/tenant shall be permitted either one monument sign (except a business center) or one projecting sign.
         (b)   Each commercial unit/tenant is allowed to have one wall sign or an awning sign.
         (c)   A second monument sign is permitted if the commercial unit has frontage on two streets.
         (d)   Each commercial unit/tenant is allowed one secondary wall sign on each rear or side wall, when the wall has frontage on an access drive or customer parking area.
         (e)   Secondary wall signs are prohibited along side or rear walls contiguous to a residence or residential zoning lot.
         (f)   Each unit/tenant is allowed to have a one window sign.
      (2)   A wall sign is allowed, provided it does not project higher than the bottom of the windowsills of the second floor or other architectural features of the building. The sign area shall not exceed 1.25 times the width in feet of the building wall relative to the occupancy, nor shall it extend within two feet of the edge of the wall. The sign area of a secondary sign shall not exceed one square foot for each linear foot of the building wall relative to the occupancy, nor shall it extend within two feet of the edge of the wall.
      (3)   A dimensional surface sign is allowed, provided it does not project more than 12 inches from the wall, and its lowest part is not less than nine feet above grade elevation at the point immediately below; nor shall it project higher than the bottom of the windowsills of the second floor or other architectural features of the building. The sign area shall not exceed one time the width in feet of the building wall relative to the occupancy, nor shall it extend within two feet of the edge of the wall. The sign area of a secondary sign shall not exceed one square foot for each linear foot of the building wall relative to the occupancy, nor shall it extend within two feet of the edge of the wall.
      (4)   An awning sign can be placed above windows and doors. The signage on the awning must not exceed 20% of the total canopy area. The awning upon which the sign is located shall be a traditional canvas design. Awning and sign colors should complement the building to which it is attached. Metal or plastic awnings are not permitted.
      (5)   A projecting sign is allowed, provided that each face shall not be more than 18 square feet in area, and no exterior dimension shall be more than six feet. The sign shall not project more than seven feet from the building wall, and no portion of the sign shall be lower than nine feet above grade, and no more than 14 feet above grade. No projecting sign, or any part of its support structure, shall be permitted to extend above the parapet of the building. For buildings over one story, no part of the sign shall be over 15 feet above grade.
      (6)   A monument sign is allowed, provided that its entire structure is inside the property lines of the premises on which the business is conducted. On outlots within a development, a monument sign shall not exceed 60 square feet in display area, and no part of the structure shall be more than six feet above the grade immediately below. On lots other than outlots, a monument sign shall not exceed 64 square feet in display area, and no part of the structure shall be more than ten feet above the grade immediately below.
      (7)   A permanent window sign shall not occupy more than 25% of the window area. A temporary window sign is allowed in addition to the permanent window sign, but may be displayed for no more than 14 days.
      (8)   Signs associated with a drive-up window facility shall be permitted when authorized by the special use permit for the drive-up window. The sign can be a dimensional surface sign or a monument sign, or a pole sign (as an exception to other provisions of this chapter). The sign shall not exceed 24 square feet in size, nor seven feet in height. Up to two signs adjacent to drive-through lanes are allowed per drive-through lane. The signs may be internally illuminated and include an electronic screen to display information to customers.
      (9)   Sidewalk signs.  Each business shall be allowed to have one sidewalk sign. The sign may only be displayed during business hours and must be removed at the close of the business day.
         (a)   Size.  The area of the sidewalk sign or object cannot exceed:
            1.   Four feet high, as measured from the sidewalk;
            2.   Two feet in width; and
            3.   Three feet in depth;
         (b)   Materials.  Materials for the sidewalk sign are limited to iron, steel, wood, plastic, fiberglass-coated wood, or a specific article or object that would identify the type of service or business offered within the store. A weight system to anchor the sign must be included in the design of the sign and be used at all times. Electricity may not be incorporated into the sign, nor any indirect or direct lighting. The Zoning Administrator may reject the permit for a sidewalk sign if it is not of an appropriate material that would withstand the elements, and/or would cause harm to pedestrians or vehicles. Signs may also be rejected if the construction and lettering are not of professional quality.
         (c)   Appearance. Lettering must be of a professional quality and consistent with the lettering examples identified in the Appendix.
         (d)   Location.  The sign must be located no more than one foot from the building wall of the unit or business for which the sign is intended, but it may not touch the building in any manner. The sign shall be placed so that a minimum of a five-foot, unobstructed pedestrian walkway is maintained at all times (not including the step-curb). A five-foot clear zone shall be maintained at corner locations of two sidewalks.
   (D)   Industrial areas.
      (1)   Each business shall be permitted one wall sign on each exterior wall of the building containing such business. Display area of the wall sign shall not exceed 1½ times the width, in feet, of the wall on which it is displayed.
      (2)   A projecting sign or monument sign may be used for each business (excluding a business center). A projecting sign shall not be more than 30 square feet in area, and it shall not project more than seven feet from the wall. No part of the sign shall be lower than nine feet above the grade level immediately below.
      (3)   If a monument sign is used, there cannot be more than one located on the lot (excluding a business center), and it must be located inside property lines of the occupant displaying the sign. It may be as large as 64 square feet display surface area (on each face). Maximum height is to be 20 feet.
      (4)   Raceway signs (as defined in § 155.05(B)(1)(f)) are permitted in industrial zoning districts subject to the size limitations established for dimensional surface signs.
   (E)   Business centers.  Business centers are permitted monument signs as determined by the following categories.
      (1)   Centers up to 40,000 square feet in gross floor area. Two monument signs for the center, having 75 feet minimum separation between signs, with each side of the sign surface area not exceeding 64 square feet. Maximum height of each sign cannot exceed ten feet.
      (2)   Centers 40,000 to 100,000 square feet in gross floor area.
         (a)   Two monument signs for the center, having 100 feet minimum separation between signs, identifying the names of tenants in the center, with each side of the sign area not exceeding 96 square feet, of which no one tenant could occupy more than 64 square feet. Maximum height of sign cannot exceed ten feet for only one business, and 20 feet for two or more businesses.
         (b)   One monument sign identifying the name of the center shall be permitted at each entrance. The sign area for each side of the sign shall not exceed 32 square feet. Maximum height of the sign cannot exceed five feet.
      (3)   Centers 100,000 square feet to 400,000 square feet gross floor area.
         (a)   Two monument signs for each frontage of an arterial or collector street, having 150 feet minimum separation between signs, identifying the names of the tenants in the center, with each side of the sign area not exceeding 128 square feet, of which no one tenant could occupy more than 64 square feet. Maximum height of the sign shall not exceed ten feet for only one business, or 20 feet for two or more businesses.
         (b)   One monument sign identifying the name of the center shall be permitted at each entrance or intersection of two arterial streets. Sign area for each side of the sign shall not exceed 32 square feet. Maximum height of sign shall not exceed six feet.
      (4)   Centers 400,000 square feet or more gross floor area.  One monument sign identifying the name of the center shall be permitted at each entrance or intersection of two arterial streets. Sign area for each side of the sign shall not exceed 128 square feet. Maximum height of the sign shall not exceed 20 feet.
(Ord. 21-020, passed 8-18-21)  Penalty, see § 155.99