8-2A-7: LANDSCAPE AND BUFFER AREA REQUIREMENTS:
   A.   Landscape Plan Required: A landscape plan is required for all developments requiring a design review, including, but not limited to, all subdivisions. The landscape plan shall be drawn to scale (no smaller than 1 inch equals 30 feet) and shall indicate the following:
      1.   Boundaries, property lines, and dimensions.
      2.   Existing trees and vegetation identified by species and size.
      3.   The location and design of areas to be landscaped.
      4.   The location and labels for all proposed plants.
      5.   Plant lists or schedules with the botanical and common name, quantity, and spacing and size of all proposed landscape material at the time of planting.
      6.   Location and description of other landscape improvements, such as earth berms, walls, fences, screens, sculptures, fountains, street furniture, lights, and courts or paved areas.
      7.   Planting and installation details as necessary to ensure conformance with all required standards.
   B.   Landscape As Percent Of Site:
      1.   Landscaping shall cover a minimum of fifteen percent (15%) of the property on multi-family residential developments. Hardscape plaza areas, such as decorative concrete/paver patios that are integrated into the design of the landscaped area, may be included in the fifteen percent (15%) landscape coverage requirement.
      2.   Landscaping shall cover a minimum of ten percent (10%) of the property on all other developments. Hardscape plaza areas, such as decorative concrete/paver patios that are integrated into the design of the landscaped area, may be included in the ten percent (10%) landscape coverage requirement.
      3.   All landscape improvements required in this section shall count toward fulfillment of the above minimum percentages.
      4.   If only a portion of a property is being developed, and if the city does not require improvements on the entire property, improvements to landscape shall continue a minimum of twenty five feet (25') (on site) beyond the proposed development.
   C.   Retention, Removal, And Replacement Of Trees:
      1.   Retention Of Existing Trees:
         a. Existing trees shall be retained unless removal is approved in writing by the city.
      2.   Removal And Replacement Of Existing Trees:
         a. Where trees are approved by the city to be removed, replacement with a species identified in section 8-2A-7Q of this article is required. For each caliper inch of deciduous tree removed, an equivalent amount of caliper inches shall be replanted. For each vertical foot of coniferous tree removed, an equivalent amount of vertical feet shall be replanted.
      Example: An eight inch (8") caliper deciduous tree is removed, an acceptable replacement would be four (4) two inch (2") caliper deciduous trees. A twelve foot (12') tall coniferous tree is removed, an acceptable replacement would be two (2) six feet (6') tall coniferous trees.
         b. When a homeowners association or its agent removes tree(s) from a subdivision common area to appropriately thin an overgrown canopy, replacement shall not be required provided the site remains in compliance with subdivision's approved landscape plan as determined by the city.
         c. Unless it is determined by the city that replacement is necessary to preserve and/or restore riparian and wildlife habitat, removal of the following trees shall not otherwise require replacement: black locust, poplar, cottonwood, willow, tree of heaven, elm, and silver maple. Trees which are weak wooded, weak branched, suckering, damaged, diseased, insect infested, or containing similar maladies may be exempt from replacement if removal is first approved by the city.
         d. In cases where the condition of the tree(s) constitutes an "emergency" as defined in section 8-1-2 of this title, the tree(s) may be removed without approval provided that the city is notified after the tree's removal and provided with documentation indicating the tree's condition at time of removal.
         e. Planting within public rights of way shall be with approval from the city and the public entity owning the property.
      3.   Damage During Construction: Existing trees or shrubs that are retained shall be protected from damage to bark, branches, or roots during construction. Construction or excavation occurring within the drip line of any public or private retained tree or shrub may severely damage the tree or shrub. Any severely damaged tree shall be replaced in accordance with subsection C2 of this section.
      4.   Grade Changes And Impervious Surfaces: Grade changes and impervious surfaces shall be allowed at a distance from the trunk of a retained tree equal to the diameter of the tree trunk plus six feet (6'), or to the drip line, whichever is furthest from the trunk.
      5.   Minimum Landscaping: Existing vegetation which is to be retained may be used to satisfy the minimum required landscaping.
   D.   Prohibited Materials And Landscaping:
      1.   No required landscape areas shall include artificial trees, plants, or any carpeting designed as a vegetative substitute.
      2.   Clear vision triangle shall be observed in regard to all vegetation. All shade trees planted within vision triangles and adjacent to any street shall be pruned to a minimum seven feet (7') above the adjacent sidewalk and fourteen feet (14') above the adjacent roadway surface. Shrubs and ground covers planted within the vision triangle shall not exceed three feet (3') height at maturity. The boundaries of the vision triangle are defined by measuring from the intersection of the edges of two (2) adjacent roadways forty feet (40') along each roadway and connecting the two (2) points with a straight line. The sight distance obstruction is also applicable to railroad-highway grade crossings with the vision triangle defined by measuring forty feet (40') along the railroad property line. In all cases, ITD and ACHD standards shall apply also.
      3.   When the city determines that a sight obstruction exists, it shall notify the owner of the property upon which the obstruction is located and order that the obstruction be removed within fifteen (15) days. The failure of the owner to remove the obstruction shall be punishable as an infraction as provided in section 1-4-1 of this code.
   E.   Installation And Minimum Standards:
      1.   Trees shall be planted in accordance with the city of Eagle tree planting specifications included as an exhibit within the EASD book. Accepted nursery standards and practices shall be followed in the planting and maintenance of landscaped areas.
      2.   Soil and slope stabilization must result after landscape installation.
      3.   Root barriers shall be installed for all new trees planted adjacent to existing or proposed public or private sidewalks and paving.
      4.   The minimum acceptable size for deciduous trees shall be two inch (2") caliper, balled and burlapped.
      5.   The minimum acceptable size for evergreen trees shall be six feet (6') to seven feet (7') balled and burlapped.
      6.   Plant material selection shall be taken from subsection Q of this section.
      7.   All landscaped areas adjacent to vehicular areas are to be protected with an approved curbing material.
      8.   a. Certification Of Completion: Upon the completion of the landscape installation, or other improvement subject to design review approval, a written certification of completion shall be prepared by the licensed landscape architect responsible for the landscape plan. The certification of completion shall state that the installation of all landscape improvements is in substantial compliance with the city approved landscape plan. This certification shall be submitted prior to the issuance of a certificate of occupancy and is required as a part of, and not in lieu of, the inspections performed and certificates issued by the city.
         b. Report Of Deficiencies: In the event that deficiencies are present after the landscape installation, or other improvements subject to design review approval, the licensed landscape architect shall prepare and file with the city a report noting the deficiencies in the improvements. The city will not accept a certification of completion, or issue a certificate of occupancy, until the licensed landscape architect has verified that the deficiencies have been corrected.
         c. Landscape Architect Designee: The licensed landscape architect may, at his or her discretion, appoint an authorized designee to certify the project provided that the designee is a licensed landscape architect.
   F.   Tree Species Mix:
      1.   When more than ten (10) trees are to be planted to meet the requirements of these guidelines, a mix of species shall be provided. The number of species to be planted shall vary according to the overall number of trees required to be planted. Species shall be planted in proportion to the required mix. See the table below:
Required Number Of Trees   Minimum Number Of Species
   11 - 20               2
   21 - 30               3
   31 - 40               4
   41 plus               5
   G.   Maintenance:
      1.   All required landscaping shall be permanently maintained in a healthy growing condition by the property owner or the property owner's representative. This includes the maintenance of street trees and/or other landscape materials within or abutting the public right of way adjacent to the subject property. The property owner shall remove, and if required to meet the standards of these requirements, shall replace any unhealthy or dead plant material immediately or as the planting season permits. In all cases, maintenance and planting within public rights of way shall be with approval from the public and/or private entities owning the property.
   H.   Completion Time:
      1.   The zoning administrator may authorize a delay in the completion of planting if a surety for one hundred fifty percent (150%) of the cost of installation is provided to the city. A final certificate of occupancy shall not be issued until all required plantings are complete.
   I.   Irrigation Required: An underground automatic irrigation system is required for all development as defined in section 8-2A-1 of this article.
      1.   All required landscaped areas must be provided with an automatic underground irrigation system.
      2.   The system shall be equipped with a reduced pressure backflow prevention device.
      3.   The system shall be designed and constructed to provide one hundred percent (100%) spray coverage.
      4.   Wherever feasible, sprinkler heads irrigating lawn or other high water demand landscape areas shall be circuited so that they are on a separate zone or zones from those irrigating trees, shrubbery or other reduced water demand areas.
      5.   Sprinkler heads shall be placed as required to reduce direct overthrow onto nonpervious areas (walks, drives, etc.).
      6.   The use of low trajectory spray nozzles is encouraged in order to reduce the effect of wind velocity on the spray system.
      7.   Use of nonpotable water for use in the irrigation of lawn and plant material is required when determined to be available.
      8.   All nonpotable water access points shall be clearly and permanently labeled with markers indicating that the water is not safe for human consumption.
      9.   Maintain all irrigation systems to ensure proper operation and water conservation.
   J.   Buffer Areas/Common Lots:
      1.   Definition: A transition zone or buffer area consists of horizontal space (land) and vertical elements (plants, berms, fences, or walls). The purpose of such buffer space is to physically separate and visually screen adjacent land uses which are not fully compatible due to differing facilities, activities, or different intensities of use, such as townhouses and a convenience store, or a high volume roadway and residential dwellings.
      2.   Minimum Requirements:
         a.   When a commercial or industrial use abuts a residential use, a ten foot (10') wide by six foot (6') high landscaped buffer is required.
         b.   When a parking lot abuts a residential activity, a five foot (5') wide by six foot (6') high landscaped buffer is required.
         c.   To conceal outdoor storage areas, trash receptacles, exposed equipment associated with any commercial or industrial activity, and off street loading when adjacent to or in view from a residential activity or public street right of way, a five foot (5') wide by six foot (6') high landscaped buffer is required.
      3.   Materials:
         a.   All buffer areas shall be comprised of, but not limited to, a mix of evergreen and deciduous trees, shrubs, and ground cover in which evergreen plant materials comprise a minimum of sixty percent (60%) of the total plant material used.
         b.   Height requirements shall be accomplished with plant material, with a fence or decorative wall.
         c.   The required buffer area shall result in an effective barrier within three (3) years and be maintained such that sixty percent (60%) or more of the vertical surface is closed and prevents the passage of vision through it.
         d.   Chainlink fencing, with slats or otherwise, and cedar fencing is prohibited for screening.
      4.   Major Roadways: New residential developments, including, but not limited to, subdivisions and multi-family developments, shall be buffered from streets classified as collectors, arterials, freeways, or expressways, to protect residential communities from noisy, potentially dangerous, high speed roads. The "buffer area" shall be defined as a common lot located between the residential lots within the subdivision and the right of way line of the adjacent roadway. This buffer is required as part of the common area open space owned and maintained by a homeowners' association. Any landscaping proposed to be within the public right of way shall not be included as a part of the buffer area required below. The height for berming/fencing, as noted below, shall be measured from the elevation of the final grade of the adjacent roadway (measured at the centerline) to the top of the proposed berming/fencing. The required buffer area width, plantings, and fencing are as follows:
         a.    Any road designated as a collector on the master street map typologies map in the Eagle comprehensive plan:
A minimum of thirty five feet (35') wide buffer area (not including right of way) shall be provided with the following plants per one hundred (100) linear feet of right of way: four (4) shade trees, five (5) evergreen trees, and twenty four (24) shrubs. Each required shade tree may be substituted with two (2) flowering/ornamental trees, provided that not more than fifty percent (50%) of the shade trees are substituted.
A minimum five foot (5') high, maximum eight foot (8') high, berm, decorative block wall, cultured stone, decorative rock, or similarly designed concrete wall, or combination thereof shall be provided within the buffer area. The maximum slope for any berm shall be three feet (3') horizontal distance to one foot (1') vertical distance. If a decorative block wall, cultured stone, decorative rock, or similarly designed concrete wall is to be provided in combination with the berm, a four foot (4') wide flat area shall be provided for the placement of the decorative wall. Chainlink, cedar, and similar high maintenance and/or unsightly fencing shall not be permitted.
         b.   Any road designated as a minor arterial on the master street map typologies map in the Eagle comprehensive plan:
A minimum of fifty feet (50') wide buffer area (not including right of way) shall be provided with the following plants per one hundred (100) linear feet of right of way: five (5) shade trees, eight (8) evergreen trees, three (3) flowering/ornamental trees, and twenty four (24) shrubs. Each required shade tree may be substituted with two (2) flowering/ornamental trees, provided that not more than fifty percent (50%) of the shade trees are substituted.
A minimum five foot (5') high, maximum eight foot (8') high, berm, decorative block wall, cultured stone, decorative rock, or similarly designed concrete wall, or combination thereof shall be provided within the buffer area. The maximum slope for any berm shall be three feet (3') horizontal distance to one foot (1') vertical distance. If a decorative block wall, cultured stone, decorative rock, or similarly designed concrete wall is to be provided, in combination with the berm, a four foot (4') wide flat area shall be provided for the placement of the decorative wall. Chainlink, cedar, and similar high maintenance and/or unsightly fencing shall not be permitted.
         c. Any road designated as a principal arterial on the master street map typologies map in the Eagle comprehensive plan:
A minimum of seventy five feet (75') wide buffer area (not including right of way) shall be provided with the following plants per one hundred (100) linear feet of right of way: six (6) shade trees, ten (10) evergreen trees, four (4) flowering/ornamental trees, and twenty four (24) shrubs. Each required shade tree may be substituted with two (2) flowering/ornamental trees, provided that not more than fifty percent (50%) of the shade trees are substituted.
A minimum ten foot (10') high, maximum twelve foot (12') high, berm, decorative block wall, cultured stone, decorative rock, or similarly designed concrete wall, or combination thereof shall be provided within the buffer area. The maximum slope for any berm shall be three feet (3') horizontal distance to one foot (1') vertical distance. If a decorative block wall, cultured stone, decorative rock, or similarly designed concrete wall is to be provided, in combination with the berm, a four foot (4') wide flat area shall be provided for the placement of the decorative wall. Chainlink, cedar, and similar high maintenance and/or unsightly fencing shall not be permitted.
      5.   Common Area Landscapes: New residential subdivision common area landscapes shall be comprised of the following:
         a.   Lawn, either seed or sod.
         b.   A minimum of one deciduous shade tree per one thousand (1,000) square feet.
      6.   Design Considerations For Residential Developments:
         a.   For design flexibility, half of the required shade trees may be substituted on a two to one (2:1) basis with ornamental and evergreen trees.
         b.   Buffer areas should include a variety of species, arranged to create varied and attractive views. Open fences, decorative walls, and berms may be used. Height changes, offset angles, different materials, and other design techniques are required so as to create variety.
   K.   Parking Lot Landscaping:
      1.   Visual Impact: Landscaping shall be provided to minimize the visual impact of off street parking:
Parking should be located to the side and rear of buildings and shall be screened so that it does not dominate the streetscape. Fences, hedges, berms, and landscaping may be used to screen parking areas (chainlink fencing shall not be permitted). In the design of large parking areas, arrange bays of parking spaces to be separated by landscaping. When parking lots occur on sloping terrain, step the parking lots to follow the terrain rather than allowing the lot surface to extend above natural grade.
      2.   Parking Lot Landscape Strip: A landscape strip shall be provided when a parking lot is located adjacent to a public right of way. The landscaped strip shall serve to shield views of parked cars to passing motorists and pedestrians, and to establish coordination among architecturally diverse buildings, which creates a pleasing, harmonious appearance along the roadway.
      Four (4) options are provided for fulfilling this requirement:
         a.   Provide a ten foot (10') wide landscaped strip between the right of way and the parking lot, and plant with a minimum of one shade tree and ten (10) shrubs per thirty five (35) linear feet of frontage, excluding driveway openings.
         b.   Provide an earth berm of thirty inches (30") minimum height (do not exceed 3:1 slope) within a ten foot (10') wide landscaped strip between the right of way and the parking lot, and plant with a minimum of one shade tree and five (5) shrubs per thirty five (35) linear feet of frontage, excluding driveway openings.
         c.   Provide a six foot (6') landscaped strip with a minimum thirty inch (30") grade drop from the right of way to the parking lot, and plant with a minimum of one shade tree and five (5) shrubs per thirty five (35) linear feet of frontage, excluding driveway openings.
         d.   Provide a three foot (3') high fence of wood, brick, stone, or decorative block or concrete along with a four foot (4') wide landscaped strip between the right of way and the parking lot, and plant a minimum of one shade tree and five (5) shrubs per thirty five (35) linear feet of frontage, excluding driveway openings.
      (1)   The board may waive the requirement for a wood, brick, stone, decorative block or concrete fence if the board finds the following:
               (A)   The applicant must design, document, and obtain city approval representing that the overall planting design, at the time of planting, results in an effective barrier such that the landscape strip shields the view of parked cars from passing pedestrians and motorists; and
               (B)   Any such proposed design alternative is compatible with the overall site design of the entire project and is compatible with the surrounding area.
      3.   Parking Lot Perimeter Landscaping: Perimeter landscaping requirements define parking areas and prevent two (2) adjacent lots from becoming one large expanse of paving. This requirement does not hinder the ability to provide vehicular access between lots.
         a.   Provide a minimum five foot (5') wide perimeter landscaped strip between the property lines and the parking lot, and plant with a minimum of one shade tree and five (5) shrubs per thirty five (35) linear feet of perimeter.
      4.   Parking Lot Interior Landscaping:
         a.   Calculated Amount: Interior parking lot landscaping shall be required on any parking lot with ten (10) spaces and above. The required amount of landscaping is based on a sliding scale, as follows:
 
Total Number Of Spaces
Percent Of Total Area Of A Lot That Must Be An Interior Landscaped Area
   10 - 20
5 percent
   21 - 50
8 percent
   51+
10 percent
 
         b.   Additional Requirements:
            (1)   No interior planter shall be less than five feet (5') in any dimension.
            (2)   No parking space shall be more than sixty feet (60') from an interior landscaped area.
            (3)   Parking islands are to be as evenly spaced as feasible throughout the lot to consistently reduce the visual impact of long rows of parked cars.
            (4)   Deciduous shade trees and ground covers or low shrubs are recommended as primary plantings in interior landscaped areas. Deciduous shade trees are to be clear branched to a height of six feet (6').
            (5)   A terminal island for a single row of parking spaces shall be landscaped with at least one tree and shrubs, ground cover, or grass. A terminal island for a double row of parking spaces shall contain not less than two (2) trees and shrubs, ground cover, or grass.
   L.   Landscaped Commercial Strips:
      1.   Landscaped strips shall be provided between all building development and public rights of way to lend continuity among different architectural styles, screen unsightly views, establish a pleasing view for motorists, and create a safe and pleasant corridor for pedestrians.
         a.   The landscaped strip shall be ten feet (10') wide minimum and planted with one shade tree and ten (10) shrubs for every thirty five feet (35') of street frontage. Two (2) ornamental or two (2) evergreen trees may be substituted for one shade tree.
   M.   Parkway Strips, Separated Sidewalks, And Street Trees:
      1. Except as may otherwise be required within the DDA, TDA, CEDA, and DSDA sidewalks shall be separated from the curb along all streets. An eight foot (8') wide minimum parkway planter strip planted with shade class (class II) trees shall be required between the sidewalk and street to provide a canopy effect over streets.
      2.   In all required applications, excluding residential developments, one street tree, selected from the approved tree list in subsection Q of this section, shall be planted per thirty five (35) linear feet of street frontage.
      3.   Within residential developments one shade class (class II) tree selected from the approved tree list in subsection Q of this section shall be located on both sides of all streets within the eight foot (8') wide landscape strip between the sidewalk and the curb. Trees shall be planted at the front of each lot generally located on each side lot line corner with the distance between trees to be a minimum of thirty five feet (35') and a maximum of eighty feet (80') of street frontage.
      4.   In all cases, any planting within public rights of way shall be with approval from the public and/or private entities owning the property.
   N.   Incentives:
      1.   The zoning administrator may reduce the site parking requirements by up to five percent (5%) of the required number of spaces if the proposed landscape plan incorporates the retention of existing significant trees, particularly in the interior of the site.
      2.   The zoning administrator may reduce the site parking requirements by up to five percent (5%) of the required number of spaces if the proposed landscaping exceeds the requirements of these guidelines by fifteen percent (15%) or more.
      3.   The zoning administrator may reduce technical standards of parking lot design where paving requirements conflict with the retention of significant trees.
   O.   Alternative Methods Of Compliance:
      1.   Project Conditions: It is not the intent of these landscape requirements to inhibit creative solutions to land use problems. Under certain site conditions, a strict interpretation of requirements may be either physically impossible or impractical. Alternative compliance is a procedure that allows certain modifications to existing regulations within this section. Requests for use of alternative landscaping schemes are justified only when one or more of the following conditions apply:
         a.   The sites involve space limitations or unusually shaped parcels;
         b.   Topography, soil, vegetation, or other site conditions are such that full compliance is impossible or impractical;
         c.   Due to a change of use of an existing site, the required buffer yard is larger than can be provided; and
         d.   Safety considerations are involved.
      2.   Request For Alternative Method Of Compliance: The applicant must provide the city with a written request if an alternative method of compliance is proposed. The request shall state which requirement as set forth within this section is to be modified, what project conditions stated within subsection O1 of this section justify using the proposed alternative, and how the proposed alternative equals or exceeds said requirement.
      3.   Tree Fund: Persons applying for an alternative method of compliance for relief from regulations that require all existing trees to remain on site may elect to make a financial contribution to the Eagle city tree fund in lieu of retaining all trees on site. The condition(s) which warrants the need for the tree fund alternate method of compliance shall be specified in the application submitted under subsection O2 of this section. If the application is approved, the amount to be contributed by the applicant will be based upon the total caliper inches of deciduous tree(s) removed from the site and the total vertical feet of coniferous trees removed from the site. Cost per caliper inch for deciduous trees and cost per vertical foot for coniferous trees shall be determined by resolution of the city council. The applicant shall have the right to review and consider the value determination, and following said review, to reapply for other alternative methods of compliance, without prejudice, in accordance with subsection O2 of this section.
   P.   Plan Preparation: Preparing a landscape plan requires special skills. Landscaping involves more than a simple arrangement of plants with irrigation; plants are not haphazardly placed in a way that fills up leftover space. Landscape plans should reflect a theme so that site elements are artfully and technically organized in a way that conveys meaning, coherence, and spatial organization. Landscaping should enhance the physical environment as well as the project's aesthetic character. Therefore, landscape plans to be submitted for approval shall be prepared by or under the responsible control of a licensed landscape architect with said plans to be duly stamped to clearly identify the preparer.
   Q.   Approved Tree List: This list is a suggested planting list. Other tree species and varieties will be considered.
 
SMALL TREES (CLASS I)
Common Name
Botanical Name
Varieties
Crabapple, flowering
Malus spp.
Adirondack
Brandywine
Coralburst
Donald Wyman
Harvest gold
Indian summer
Prairiefire
Purple prince
Radiant
Red jewel
Robinson
Royalty
Sargent
Spring snow
Strawberry parf
Transitoria
 
 
 
Dogwood, flowering
Cornus florida
Cloud 9
Goldenraintree
Koelreuteria paniculata
September
Hawthorn, Washington
Crataegus phaenopyrum
 
Lilac, Japanese tree
Syringa reticulata
Ivory silk
Magnolia, saucer
Magnolia x soulangiana
 
Maple, amur
Acer ginnala
Flame
Maple, hedge
Acer campestre
Queen Elizabeth
Pear, callery
Pyrus calleryana
Aristocrat
Capitol
Chanticleer
Cleveland
Redspire
Plum, flowering
Prunus spp.
Blireiana
Newport
Plum, purple leaf
Prunus cerasifera
 
Redbud, eastern
Cercis canadensis
 
Smoke tree, common
Cotinus coggygria
 
Sumac, stag horn
Rus typhina
Laciniata
 
 
 
MEDIUM TREES (CLASS II)
Common Name
Botanical Name
Varieties
Alder, mountain
Alnus tenuifolia
 
Ash, green
Fraxinus pennsylvanica
Bergeson
Cimaron
Marshall
Patmore
Urbanite
Ash, raywood
Fraxinus oxycarpa
Raywood
Flame
Ash, white
Fraxinus americana
Autumn applause
Autumn purple
Rosehill
Skyline
Birch, river
Betula nigra
Heritage
Buckeye, yellow
Aesculus octandra
 
Cherry, Japanese - kanzan
Prunus serrulata
 
Corktree, amur
Phellodendron amurense
Macho
Filbert, Turkish
Corylus colurna
 
Ginkgo (male only)
Ginkgo biloba
Princeton sentry
Magyar
Autumn gold
Hackberry, common
Celtis occidentalis
Prairie pride
Honeylocust, thornless
Gleditsia triancanthos
  inermis
Shademaster
Skyline
Moraine
Hornbeam, European
Carpinus betulus
Fastigiata
Horsechestnut, common
Aesculus hippocastanum
Baumannii
Katsuratree
Cercidiphyllum japonicum
 
Linden, American
Tilia americana
Redmond
Legend
Linden, littleleaf
Tilia cordata
Chancellor
Corzam
Glenleven
Greenspire
Linden, silver
Tilia tomentosa
Green mtn.
Sterling
Magnolia, cucumber tree
Magnolia acuminata
 
Maple, Norway
Acer platanoides
Columnare
Deborah
Emerald queen
Royal red
Maple, sugar
Acer saccharum
Green mtn.
Legacy
Pagoda tree, Japanese
Sophora japonica
Regent
Persimmon, common
Diospyros virginiana
 
Sweetgum, American
Liquidambar styracaflua
Moraine
Yellowwood, American
Cladrastis kentukea
 
 
 
 
LARGE TREES (CLASS III)
Common Name
Botanical Name
Varieties
Beech, European
Fagus sylvatica
Asplenifolia
Riversii
Roseo-Marginata
Pendula
Catalpa, northern
Catalpa speciosa
 
Coffee tree, Kentucky
Gymnocladus dioicus
Espresso
Cottonwood, black
Populus trichocarpa
 
Hickory, shagbark
Carya ovata
 
Oak, bur
Quercus macrocarpa
 
Oak, English
Quercus robur
Fastigiata
Pyramich
Oak, red
Quercus rubra
 
Oak, swamp white
Quercus bicolor
 
Plane tree, London
Platanus x acerifolia
Bloodgood
Tulip tree
Liriodendron tulipifera
 
Zelkova, Japanese
Zelkova serrata
Village green
 
 
 
CONIFERS
Common Name
Botanical Name
Varieties
 
 
 
Arborvitae, eastern
Thuja occidentalis
 
Bald cypress, common
Taxodium distichum
Monarch of
  Illinois
Shawnee brave
Cedar, blue atlas
Cedrus atlantica glauca
Glauca pendula -
weeping
Fastigiata -
columnar form
Cedar, weeping Alaska
Chamaecyparis nootkatensis
Pendula
Douglas fir
Pseudotsuga menziesii
 
False cypress, lawson
Chamaecyparis lawsoniana
Allumii
Stewartii
Fir, white
Abies concolor
Violacea
Incense cedar, California
Calocedrus decurrens
 
Juniper, Rocky Mountain
Juniperus scopulorum
 
Larch, European
Larix decidua
Pendula
Pine, Austrian
Pinus nigra
 
Pine, bristlecone
Pinus aristata
 
Pine, eastern white
Pinus strobes
 
Pine, limber
Pinus flexilis
 
Pine, mugo
Pinus mugo
 
Pine, ponderosa
Pinus ponderosa
 
Pine, Scotch
Pinus sylvestris
 
Redwood, dawn
Metasequoia glyptostroboides
 
Sequoia, giant
Sequoiadendron giganteum
 
Spruce, Colorado
Picea pungens
Glauca
Hoopsii
Koster
Moerheimii
Spruce, Norway
Picea abies
 
Spruce, Serbian
Picea omorika
 
Spruce, white
  (Black Hills)
Picea glauca
Densata
 
(Ord. 434, 1-14-2003; amd. Ord. 462, 11-11-2003; Ord. 566, 5-15-2007; Ord. 618, 2-17-2009; Ord. 699, 5-28-2013; Ord. 703, 9-24-2013; Ord. 820, 12-10-2019)