§ 10.11  ANIMAL LICENSING AND REGULATION.
   (A)   Definitions.  For the purpose of this section, the following definitions shall apply unless the context clearly indicates or requires a different meaning.
      ANIMAL.  Any mammal, reptile, amphibian, fish, bird (including all fowl and poultry) or other member commonly accepted as a part of the animal kingdom.  Animals shall be classified as follows:
         (a)   DOMESTIC ANIMALS.  Those animals commonly accepted as domesticated household pets.  Unless otherwise defined, domestic animals shall include dogs, cats, caged birds, gerbils, hamsters, guinea pigs, domesticated rabbits, fish, non-poisonous, non-venomous and non- constricting reptiles or amphibians, and other similar animals.
         (b)   FARM ANIMALS.  Those animals commonly associated with a farm or performing work in an agricultural setting.  Unless otherwise defined, farm animals shall include members of the equine family (horses, mules), bovine family (cows, bulls), sheep, poultry (chickens, turkeys), fowl (ducks, geese), swine (including Vietnamese pot-bellied pigs), goats, bees, ratitae (ostriches and emus), farm raised cervidae (caribous and mule deer), llamas and alpacas and other animals associated with a farm, ranch, or stable.
         (c)   NON-DOMESTIC ANIMALS.  Those animals commonly considered to be naturally wild and not naturally trained or domesticated, or which are commonly considered to be inherently dangerous to the health, safety, and welfare of  people.  Unless otherwise defined, non-domestic animals shall include:
            1.   Any member of the large cat family (family felidae) including lions, tigers, cougars, bobcats, leopards and jaguars, but excluding commonly accepted domesticated house cats.
            2.   Any naturally wild member of the canine family (family canidae) including wolves, foxes, coyotes, dingoes, and jackals, but excluding commonly accepted domesticated dogs.
            3.   Any crossbreeds such as the crossbreed between a wolf and a dog, unless the crossbreed is commonly accepted as a domesticated house pet.
            4.   Any member or relative of the rodent family including any skunk (whether or not descented), raccoon, squirrel, or ferret, but excluding those members otherwise defined or commonly accepted as domesticated pets.
            5.   Any poisonous, venomous, constricting, or inherently dangerous member of the reptile or amphibian families including rattlesnakes, boa constrictors, pit vipers, crocodiles and alligators.
            6.   Any other animal which is not explicitly listed above but which can be reasonably defined by the terms of this section, including but not limited to bears, deer, monkeys and game fish.
      AT LARGE.  Off the premises of the owner and not under the custody and control of the owner or other person, either by leash, cord, chain, or otherwise restrained or confined.
      CAT.  Both the male and female of the felidae species commonly accepted as domesticated household pets.
      DOG.  Both the male and female of the canine species, commonly accepted as domesticated household pets, and other domesticated animals of a dog kind.
      OWNER.  Any person or persons, firm, association or corporation owning, keeping, or harboring an animal.
      RELEASE PERMIT.  A permit issued by the Animal Control Officer or other person in charge of the pound for the release of any animal that has been taken to the pound.  A release permit may be obtained upon payment of a fee to the City Clerk in accordance with the regular license requirement if the animal is unlicensed, payment of a release fee, and any maintenance costs incurred in capturing and impounding the animal.  The release fee shall be as established by City Council.
   (B)   Dogs and cats. 
      (1)   Running at large prohibited.  It shall be unlawful for the dog or cat of any person who owns, harbors, or keeps a dog or cat, to run at large. A person, who owns, harbors, or keeps a dog or cat which runs at large shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. Dogs or cats on a leash and accompanied by a responsible person or accompanied by and under the control and direction of a responsible person, so as to be effectively restrained by command as by leash, shall be permitted in streets or on public land unless the city has posted an area with signs reading “Dogs or Cats Prohibited.”
      (2)   License required.
         (a)   All dogs over the age of six months kept, harbored, or maintained by their owners in the city, shall be licensed and registered with the city. Dog licenses shall be issued by the City Clerk upon payment of the license fee as established by City Council. The owner shall state, at the time application is made for the license and upon forms provided, his or her name and address and the name, breed, color, and sex of each dog owned or kept by him or her. No license shall be granted for a dog that has not been vaccinated against distemper and rabies, as evidenced by a certificate by a veterinarian qualified to practice in the state in which the dog is vaccinated.
         (b)   It shall be the duty of each owner of a dog subject to this section to pay to the City Clerk the license fee established by City Council.
         (c)   Upon payment of the license fee as established by City Council, the Clerk shall issue to the owner a license certificate and metallic tag for each dog licensed. The tag shall have stamped on it the year for which it is issued and the number corresponding with the number on the certificate. Every owner shall be required to provide each dog with a collar to which the license tag must be affixed, and shall see that the collar and tag are constantly worn. In case a dog tag is lost or destroyed, a duplicate shall be issued by the City Clerk.  A charge shall be made for each duplicate tag in an amount established by City Council.  Dog tags shall not be transferable from one dog to another and no refunds shall be made on any dog license fee or tag because of death of a dog or the owner’s leaving the city before the expiration of the license period.
         (d)   The licensing provisions of this division (B)(2) shall not apply to dogs whose owners are nonresidents temporarily within the city, nor to dogs brought into the city for the purpose of participating in any dog show.  If the animal owned is a service animal which is capable of being properly identified as from a recognized school for seeing eye, hearing ear, service or guide animals, and the owner is a blind or deaf person, or a person with physical or sensory disabilities, then no license shall be required.
         (e)   The funds received by the City Clerk from all dog licenses and metallic tags fees as established by City Council, shall first be used to defray any costs incidental to the enforcement of this section; including, but not restricted to, the costs of licenses, metallic tags, and impounding and maintenance of the dogs.
      (3)   Cats.  Cats shall be included as controlled by this division  insofar as running-at-large, pickup, impounding, boarding, licensing and proof of anti-rabies vaccine is concerned. All other provisions of this section shall also apply to cats unless otherwise provided.
      (4)   Vaccination.
         (a)   All dogs and cats kept harbored, maintained, or transported within the city shall be vaccinated at least once every three years by a licensed veterinarian for:
            1.   Rabies - with a live modified vaccine; and
            2.   Distemper.
         (b)   A certificate of vaccination must be kept on which is stated the date of vaccination, owner’s name and address, the animal’s name (if applicable), sex, description and weight, the type of vaccine, and the veterinarian’s signature. Upon demand made by the City Clerk, the Animal Control Officer or a police officer, the owner shall present for examination the required certificate(s) of vaccination for the animal(s). In cases where certificates are not presented, the owner or keeper of the animal(s) shall have seven days in which to present the certificate(s) to the City Clerk or officer. Failure to do so shall be deemed a violation of this section.
   (C)   Non-domestic animals.  Except as provided in M.S. § 346.155, as it may be amended from time to time, it shall be illegal for any person to own, possess, harbor, or offer for sale, any non-domestic animal within the city.  Any owner of a non-domestic animal at the time of adoption of this code shall have 30 days in which to remove the animal from the city after which time the city may impound the animal as provided for in this division (C).  An exception shall be made to this prohibition for animals specifically trained for and actually providing assistance to the handicapped or disabled, and for those animals brought into the city as part of an operating zoo, veterinarian clinic, scientific research laboratory, or a licensed show or exhibition.
   (D)   Farm animals.  Farm animals shall only be kept in an agricultural district of the city, or on a residential lot of at least ten acres in size provided that no animal shelter shall be within 300 feet of an adjoining piece of property.  An exception shall be made to this section for those animals brought into the city as part of an operating zoo, veterinarian clinic, scientific research laboratory, or a licensed show or exhibition.
   (E)   Impounding.
      (1)   Running at large.  Any unlicensed animal running at large is hereby declared a public nuisance.  Any Animal Control Officer or police officer may impound any dog or other animal found unlicensed or any animal found running at large and shall give notice of the impounding to the owner of the dog or other animal, if known.  The Animal Control Officer or police officer shall not enter the property of the owner of an animal found running at large or the owner of an unlicensed animal unless the officer has first obtained the permission of the owner to do so or has obtained a warrant issued by a court of competent jurisdiction to search for and seize the animal.  In case the owner is unknown, the officer shall post notice at the city office that if the dog or other animal  is not claimed within the time specified in division (E)(3) of this section, it will be sold or otherwise disposed of. Except as otherwise provided in this section, it shall be unlawful to kill, destroy, or otherwise cause injury to any animal, including dogs and cats running at large.
      (2)   Biting animals.  Any animal that has not been inoculated by a live modified rabies vaccine and which has bitten any person, wherein the skin has been punctured or the services of a doctor are required, shall be confined in the city pound for a period of not less than ten days, at the expense of the owner.  The animal may be released at the end of the time if healthy and free from symptoms of rabies, and by the payment of all costs by the owner.  However, if the owner of the animal shall elect immediately upon receipt of notice of need for the confinement by the officer to voluntarily and immediately confine the animal for the required period of time in a veterinary hospital of the owner’s choosing, not outside of the county in which this city is located, and provide immediate proof of confinement in the manner as may be required, the owner may do so.  If, however, the animal has been inoculated with a live modified rabies vaccine and the owner has proof of the vaccination by a certificate from a licensed veterinarian, the owner may confine the dog or other animal to the owner’s property.
      (3)   Reclaiming.  For the purposes of this section regular business day means a day during which the establishment having custody of the animal is open to the public at least four consecutive hours between 8:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. All animals conveyed to the pound shall be kept, with humane treatment and sufficient food and water for their comfort, at least five regular business days, unless the animal is a dangerous animal as defined under division (K) of this section in which case it shall be kept for seven regular business days or the times specified in division (K) of this section, and except if the animal is a cruelly-treated animal in which case it shall be kept for ten regular business days, unless sooner reclaimed by their owners or keepers as provided by this section. In case the owner or keeper shall desire to reclaim the animal from the pound, the following shall be required, unless otherwise provided for in this code or established from time to time by resolution of the City Council:
         (a)   Payment of the release fee and receipt of a release permit as established by the City Council.
         (b)    Payment of maintenance costs, as provided by the pound, per day or any part of day while animal is in the pound; and
         (c)   If a dog is unlicensed, payment of a regular license fee as established by City Council, and valid certificate of vaccination for rabies and distemper shots is required.
      (4)   Unclaimed animals.  At the expiration of the times established in division (E)(3) of this section, if the animal has not been reclaimed in accordance with the provisions of this section, the officer appointed to enforce this section may dispose of the unclaimed animal in a manner permitted by law. Any money collected under this section shall be payable to the City Clerk.
   (F)   Kennels.
      (1)   Definition of kennel. The keeping of three or more dogs on the same premises, whether owned by the same person or not and for whatever purpose kept, shall constitute a “kennel”; except that a fresh litter of pups may be kept for a period of three months before that keeping shall be deemed to be a “kennel.”
      (2)   Kennel as a nuisance. Because the keeping of three or more dogs on the same premises is subject to great abuse, causing discomfort to persons in the area by way of smell, noise, hazard, and general aesthetic depreciation, the keeping of three or more dogs on the premises is hereby declared to be a nuisance and no person shall keep or maintain a kennel within the city. 
   (G)   Barking/crying/whining dogs.
      (1)   Habitual barking.  It shall be unlawful for any person to keep or harbor a dog which habitually barks or cries.  Habitual barking shall be defined as barking for repeated intervals of at least five minutes with less than one minute of interruption.  The barking must also be audible off of the owner’s or caretaker’s premises.
      (2)   Damage to property.  It shall be unlawful for any person’s dog or other animal to damage any lawn, garden, or other property, whether or not the owner has knowledge of the damage.
      (3)   Cleaning up litter.  The owner of any animal or person having the custody or control of any animal shall be responsible for cleaning up any feces of the animal and disposing of the feces in a sanitary manner whether on their own property, on the property of others or on public property.
      (4)   Warrant required.  The Animal Control Officer or police officer shall not enter the property of the owner of an animal described in this section unless the officer has first obtained the permission of the owner to do so or has obtained a warrant issued by a court of competent jurisdiction to search for and seize the animal.
   (H)   Seizure of animals.  Any police officer or Animal Control Officer may enter upon private property and seize any animal with the permission of the owner of the property, if that person is also the owner of the animal, provided that the following exist:
      (1)   There is an identified complainant other than the police officer or Animal Control Officer making a contemporaneous complaint about the animal;
      (2)   The officer reasonably believes that the animal meets either the barking dog criteria set out in division (G)(1); the criteria for cruelty set out in division (L) of this section; or the criteria for an at large animal set out in division (B)(1) of this section;
      (3)   The officer can demonstrate that there has been at least one previous complaint of a barking dog; inhumane treatment of the animal; or that the animal was at large at this address on a prior date;
      (4)   The officer has made a reasonable attempt to contact the owner of the animal and the property to be entered and those attempts have either failed or have been ignored;
      (5)   The Animal Control Officer or police officer shall not enter the property of the owner of an animal described in this section unless the officer has first obtained the permission of the owner to do so or has obtained a warrant issued by a court of competent jurisdiction to search for and seize the animal.  If the officer has the permission of the owner, a property manager, landlord, innkeeper, or other authorized person to enter the property or has obtained a pass key from a property manager, landlord, innkeeper, or other authorized person to have that key shall not be considered unauthorized entry, and a warrant to search for and seize the animal need not be obtained; and
      (6)   Written notice of the seizure is left in a conspicuous place if personal contact with the owner of the animal is not possible.
   (I)   Animals presenting a danger to health and safety of city. If, in the reasonable belief of any person or the Animal Control Officer or police officer, an animal presents an immediate danger to the health and safety of any person, or the animal is threatening imminent harm to any person, or the animal is in the process of attacking any person, the person or officer may destroy the animal in a proper and humane manner whether or not the animal is on the property of its owner.  Otherwise, the person or officer may apprehend the animal and deliver it to the pound for confinement under division (E) of this section. If the animal is destroyed, the owner or keeper of the animal destroyed shall be liable to the city for the cost of maintaining and disposing of the animal, plus the costs of any veterinarian examination. If the animal is found not to be a danger to the health and safety of the city, it may be released to the owner or keeper in accordance with division (E)(3) of this section.
   (J)   Diseased animals.
      (1)   Running at large.  No person shall keep or allow to be kept on his or her premises, or on premises occupied by them, nor permit to run at large in the city, any animal which is diseased so as to be a danger to the health and safety of the city, even though the animal be properly licensed under this section, and a warrant to search for and seize the animal is not required.
      (2)   Confinement.  Any animal reasonably suspected of being diseased and presenting a threat to the health and safety of the public, may be apprehended and confined in the pound by any person, the Animal Control Officer or a police officer. The officer shall have a qualified veterinarian examine the animal. If the animal is found to be diseased in a manner so as to be a danger to the health and safety of the city, the officer shall cause the animal to be painlessly killed and shall properly dispose of the remains. The owner or keeper of the animal killed under this section shall be liable to the city for the cost of maintaining and disposing of the animal, plus the costs of any veterinarian examinations.
      (3)   Release.  If the animal, upon examination, is not found to be diseased the animal shall be released to the owner or keeper free of charge.
   (K)   Dangerous and potentially dangerous dogs.
      (1)   Adoption by reference.  Except as otherwise provided in this section, the regulatory and procedural provisions of M.S. §§ 347.50 to 347.565, as they may be amended from time to time (commonly referred to as the “Dangerous Dog Regulations”), are adopted by reference.
      (2)   Definitions.  Definitions in this section shall have the following meanings:
         (a)   DANGEROUS DOG.  A dog that:
            1.   Has when unprovoked, inflicted substantial bodily harm on a human being on public or private property;
            2.   Has killed a domestic animal when unprovoked while off the owner’s property;
            3.   Has attacked one or more persons on two or more occasions; or
            4.   Has been found to be potentially dangerous and after the owner has notice of the same, the dog aggressively bites, attacks or endangers the safety of humans or domestic animals.
         (b)   DOG.  Both the male and female of the canine species, commonly accepted as domesticated household pets.
         (c)   GREAT BODILY HARM.  Bodily injury which creates a high probability of death, or which causes serious permanent disfigurement, or which causes a permanent or protracted loss or impairment of the function of any bodily member or organ or other serious bodily harm.
         (d)   OWNER.  Any person or persons, firm, corporation, organization, department, or association owning, possessing, harboring, keeping, having an interest in, or having care, custody or control of a dog.
         (e)   MAINTENANCE COSTS.  Any costs incurred as a result of seizing an animal for impoundment, including, but not limited to, the capturing, impounding, keeping, treating, examining, securing, confining, feeding, destroying, boarding or maintaining seized animals, whether these services are provided by the city or the pound.
         (f)   POTENTIALLY DANGEROUS DOG.  A dog that:
            1.   Has when unprovoked, inflicted a bite on a human or domestic animal on public or private property;
            2.   Has when unprovoked, chased or approached a person, including a person on a bicycle, upon the streets, sidewalks or any public or private property, other than the owner's property, in an apparent attitude of attack; or
            3.   Has a known propensity, tendency or disposition to attack unprovoked, causing injury or otherwise threatening the safety of humans or domestic animals.
         (g)   PROPER ENCLOSURE.  Securely confined indoors or in a securely enclosed and locked pen or structure suitable to prevent the dog from escaping and to provide protection for the dog from the elements. A proper enclosure does not include a porch, patio, or any part of a house, garage, or other structure that would allow the dog to exit of its own volition, or any house or structure in which windows are open or in which door or window screens are the only barriers which prevent the dog from exiting. The enclosure shall not allow the egress of the dog in any manner without human assistance. A pen or kennel shall meet the following minimum specifications:
            1.   A minimum overall floor size of 32 square feet.
            2.   Sidewalls shall have a minimum height of five feet and be constructed of 11-gauge or heavier wire. Openings in the wire shall not exceed two inches, support post shall be one and one-fourth inch or larger steel pipe buried in the ground 18 inches or more. When a concrete floor is not provided, the sidewalls shall be buried a minimum of 18 inches in the ground.
            3.   A cover over the entire pen or kennel shall be provided. The cover shall be constructed of the same gauge wire or heavier as the sidewalls and openings in the wire shall not exceed two inches.
            4.   An entrance/exit gate shall be provided and be constructed of the same material as the sidewalls and openings in the wire shall not exceed two inches. The gate shall be self-closing and self-locking. The gate shall be locked at all times when the dog is in the pen or kennel.
         (h)   SUBSTANTIAL BODILY HARM.  Bodily injury that involves a temporary but substantial disfigurement, or that causes a temporary but substantial loss or impairment of the function of any bodily member or organ or that causes a fracture of any bodily member.
         (i)   UNPROVOKED.  The condition in which the dog is not purposely excited, stimulated, agitated or disturbed.
      (3)   Declaration of dangerous or potentially dangerous dog.
         (a)   A police officer, community service officer, animal control officer or other authorized city employee may declare a dog to be dangerous or potentially dangerous when the officer has probable cause to believe that a dog is dangerous or potentially dangerous. The following factors will be considered in determining a dangerous or potentially dangerous dog:
            1.   Whether any injury or damage to a person by the dog was caused while the dog was protecting or defending a person or the dog’s offspring within the immediate vicinity of the dog from an unjustified attack or assault.
            2.   The size and strength of the dog, including jaw strength, and the animal’s propensity to bite humans or other domestic animals.
            3.   Whether the dog has wounds, scarring, is observed in a fight, or has other indications that the dog has been or will be used, trained or encouraged to fight with another animal or whose owner is in possession of any training apparatus, paraphernalia or drugs used to prepare such dogs to fight with other animals.
         (b)   Beginning six months after a dog is declared dangerous or potentially dangerous, an owner  may request annually that the city review the designation. The owner must provide evidence that the dog's behavior has changed due to the dog's age, neutering, environment, completion of obedience training or other factors. If enough evidence is provided, the city may rescind the designation.
         (c)   Exceptions.
            1.   The provisions of this section do not apply to dogs used by law enforcement.
            2.   Dogs may not be declared dangerous or potentially dangerous if the threat, injury, or danger was sustained by a person who was:
               A.   Committing a willful trespass or other tort upon the premises occupied by the owner of the dog;
               B.   Provoking, tormenting, abusing or assaulting the dog, or who can be shown to have a history of repeatedly provoking, tormenting, abusing, or assaulting the dog; or
               C.   Committing or attempting to commit a crime.
      (4)   License required. The owner must annually license dangerous and potentially dangerous dogs with the city and must license a newly declared dangerous or potentially dangerous dog within 14 days after notice that a dog has been declared dangerous or potentially dangerous. Regardless of any appeal that may be requested, the owner must comply with the requirements of M.S. § 347.52 (a) and (c), as they may be amended from time to time, regarding proper enclosures and notification to the city upon transfer or death of the dog, until and unless a hearing officer or court of law reverses the declaration.
         (a)   Process for dangerous dogs. The city will issue a license to the owner of a dangerous dog if the owner presents sufficient evidence that:
            1.   There is a proper enclosure;
            2.   Written proof that there is a surety bond by a surety company authorized to conduct business in Minnesota in the sum of at least $300,000, payable to any person injured by a dangerous dog, or receipt of a copy of a policy of liability insurance issued by an insurance company authorized to do business in Minnesota in the amount of at least $300,000, insuring the owner for any personal injuries inflicted by the dangerous dog. Such surety bond or insurance policy shall provide that no cancellation of the bond or policy will be made unless the city is notified in writing by the surety company or the insurance company at least ten days prior to such cancellation;
            3.   The owner has paid the annual license fee for dangerous dogs as established by City Council.
            4.   The owner has had a microchip identification implanted in the dangerous dog. The name of the microchip manufacturer and identification number of the microchip must be provided to the city. If the microchip is not implanted by the owner, it may be implanted by the city at the owner’s expense; and
            5.   The owner provides proof that the dog has been sterilized. If the owner does not sterilize the dog within 30 days, the city may seize the dog and sterilize it at the owner’s expense.
         (b)   Process for potentially dangerous dogs. The city will issue a license to the owner of a potentially dangerous dog if the owner presents sufficient evidence that:
            1.   There is a proper enclosure;
            2.   The owner has paid the annual license fee;
            3.   The owner has had a microchip identification implanted in the potentially dangerous dog. The name of the microchip manufacturer and identification number of the microchip must be provided to the city. If the microchip is not implanted by the owner, it may be implanted by the city at the owner’s expense.
         (c)   Inspection. A pre-license inspection of the premises to insure compliance with the city code is required. If the city issues a license to the owner of a dangerous or potentially dangerous dog, the city shall be allowed at any reasonable time to inspect the dog, the proper enclosure and all places where the animal is kept.
         (d)   Warning symbol. The owner of a dangerous dog licensed under this section must post a sign with the uniform dangerous dog warning symbol on the property in order to inform children that there is a dangerous dog on the property. The sign will be provided by the city upon issuance of the license.
         (e)   Tags. A dangerous dog licensed under this section must wear a standardized, easily identifiable tag at all times that contains the uniform dangerous dog symbol, identifying the dog as dangerous. The tag shall be provided by the city upon issuance of the license.
         (f)   License fee. The city will charge the owner an annual license fee for a dangerous or potentially dangerous dog as established by City Council.
      (5)   Properly restrained in proper enclosure or outside of proper enclosure. While on the owner's property, an owner of a dangerous or potentially dangerous dog must keep it in a proper enclosure. Inside a residential home, there must be a secured area maintained where the dog will stay when persons other than family members are present. If the dog is outside the proper enclosure, the dog must be muzzled and restrained by a substantial chain or leash no longer than four feet and under the physical restraint of an adult. The muzzle must be made in a manner that will prevent the dog from biting any person or animal but that will not cause injury to the dog or interfere with its vision or respiration.
      (6)   Notification requirements to city.
         (a)   Relocation or death. The owner of a dog that has been declared dangerous or potentially dangerous must notify the City Clerk in writing if the dog is to be relocated from its current address or if the dog has died. The notification must be given in writing within 30 days of the relocation or death. The notification must include the current owner's name and address, and the new owner’s name and the relocation address. If the relocation address is outside of the city, the city may notify the local law enforcement agency of the transfer of the dog into its jurisdiction.
         (b)   Renter’s obligations. A person who owns or possess a dangerous or potentially dangerous dog and who will rent property from another where the dog will reside must disclose to the property owner prior to entering the lease agreement and at the time of any lease renewal periods that the person owns or possesses a dangerous or potentially dangerous dog that will reside at the property. A dog owner, who is currently renting property, must notify the property owner within 14 days of city notification if the owned dog is newly declared as dangerous or potentially dangerous and the owner keeps the dog on the property.
         (c)   Transfer of ownership into the city. No dog that has been previously determined to be dangerous or potentially dangerous by another jurisdiction shall be kept, owned or harbored in the city unless the dog’s owner complies with the requirements of this section prior to bringing the dog into the city. Dogs in violation of this division are subject to impoundment and destruction.
      (7)   Seizure. Animal control may immediately seize any dangerous or potentially dangerous dog if:
         (a)   After 14 days after the owner has notice that the dog is declared dangerous or potentially dangerous, the dog is not validly licensed and no appeal has been filed;
         (b)   After 14 days after the owner has notice that the dog is dangerous, the owner does not secure the proper liability insurance or surety coverage as required or such required insurance is cancelled;
         (c)   The dog is not maintained in a proper enclosure;
         (d)   The dog is outside the proper enclosure and not under proper restraint, as required by division (K)(5) of this section;
         (e)   After 30 days after the owner has notice that the dog is dangerous, the dog is not sterilized, as required by division (K)(4)(a)5. of this section;
         (f)   The dog’s microchip has been removed.
      (8)   Reclamation. A dog seized under this division (K)(7) of this section may be reclaimed by the owner of the dog upon payment of maintenance costs, and presenting proof to animal control that the requirements of this division (K) have been met. A dog not reclaimed under this subsection (7) within seven days may be disposed of and the owner will be liable to the city for maintenance costs. A person claiming an interest in a seized dog may prevent disposition of the dog by posting a security in an amount sufficient to provide for the dog’s maintenance costs. The security must be posted with the city within seven days of the seizure inclusive of the date seized.
      (9)   Subsequent offenses: seizure. If a person has been convicted of violating a provision of this section, and the person is charged with a subsequent violation relating to the same dog, the dog may be seized. If the owner is convicted of the crime for which the dog was seized, the court may order that the dog be destroyed in a proper and humane manner and the owner pay the maintenance costs. If the owner is not convicted and the dog is not reclaimed by the owner within seven days after the owner has been notified that the dog may be reclaimed, the dog may be disposed of in manner permitted by law.
      (10)   Notice, hearings.
         (a)   Notice. After a dog has been declared dangerous or potentially dangerous or has been seized for destruction, the city shall give notice by delivering or mailing it to the owner of the dog, or by posting a copy of it at the place where the dog is kept, or by delivering it to a person residing on the property, and telephoning, if possible. The notice shall include:
            1.   A description of the seized dog; the authority for and purpose of the declaration and seizure; the time, place, and circumstances under which the dog was declared; and the telephone number and contact person where the dog is kept;
            2.   A statement that the owner of the dog may request a hearing concerning the declaration and that failure to do so within 14 days of the date of the notice will terminate the owner’s right to a hearing;
            3.   A statement that if an appeal request is made within 14 days of the notice, the owner must immediately comply with the requirements of M.S. § 347.52, paragraphs (a) and (c), as they may be amended from time to time, regarding proper enclosures and notification to the city upon transfer or death of the dog, until such time as the hearing officer issues an opinion;
            4.   A statement that if the hearing officer affirms the dangerous dog declaration, the owner will have 14 days from receipt of that decision to comply with all other requirements of M.S. §§ 347.51, 347.515, and 347.52, as they may be amended from time to time;
            5.   A form to request a hearing; and
            6.   A statement that if the dog has been seized, all maintenance costs of the care, keeping, and disposition of the dog pending the outcome of the hearing are the responsibility of the owner, unless a court or hearing officer finds that the seizure or impoundment was not reasonably justified by law.
         (b)   Right to hearing.
            1.   After a dog has been declared dangerous, potentially dangerous or has been seized for destruction, the owner may appeal in writing to the city within 14 days after notice of the declaration or seizure. Failure to do so within 14 days of the date of the notice will terminate the owner's right to a hearing. The owner must pay a $100 fee for an appeal hearing.
            2.   The appeal hearing will be held within 14 days of the request. The hearing officer must be an impartial employee of the city or an impartial person retained by the city to conduct the hearing.
            3.   If the declaration or destruction is upheld by the hearing officer, actual expenses of the hearing up to a maximum of $1,000, as well as all maintenance costs, will be the responsibility of the dog’s owner. The hearing officer shall issue a decision on the matter within ten days after the hearing. The decision shall be delivered to the dog's owner by hand delivery or registered mail as soon as practical and a copy shall be provided to the city. The decision of the hearing officer is final.
      (11)   Destruction of certain dogs. The Police Chief and/or hearing officer are authorized to order the destruction or other disposition of any dog, after proper notice is given pursuant to division (K)(10) of this section and upon a finding that:
         (a)   The dog has habitually destroyed property or habitually trespassed in a damaging manner on property of persons other than the owner;
         (b)   The dog has been declared dangerous, the owner’s right to appeal hereunder has been exhausted or expired, and the owner has failed to comply with the provisions of this section;
         (c)   It is determined that the dog is infected with rabies;
         (d)   The dog inflicted substantial or great bodily harm on a human on public or private property without provocation;
         (e)   The dog inflicted multiple bites on a human on public or private property without provocation;
         (f)   The dog bit multiple human victims on public or private property in the same attack without provocation;
         (g)   The dog bit a human on public or private property without provocation in an attack where more than one dog participated in the attack; or
         (h)   The dog poses a danger to the public's health, safety or welfare. In determining whether the dog poses a danger to the public's health, safety or welfare, the following factors may be considered:
            1.   The dog weighs more than 20 pounds;
            2.   The strength of the dog, including jaw strength;
            3.   The dog’s tolerance for pain;
            4.   The dog’s tendency to refuse to terminate an attack;
            5.   The dog’s propensity to bite humans or other domestic animals;
            6.   The dog’s potential for unpredictable behavior;
            7.   The dog’s aggressiveness;
            8.   The likelihood that a bite by the dog will result in serious injury.
      (12)   Concealing of dogs. No person may harbor, hide or conceal a dog that the city has the authority to seize or that has been ordered into custody for destruction or other proper disposition.
      (13)   Dog ownership prohibited.
         (a)   Except as provided below, a person shall not own a dog if the person has been:
            1.   Convicted of a third or subsequent violation of division (K)(4), (5) or (6) of this section or similar ordinance in another jurisdiction, or M.S. §§ 347.51, 347.515 or 347.52, as they may be amended from time to time;
            2.   Convicted of 2nd degree manslaughter due to negligent or intentional use of a dog under M.S. § 609.205 (4), as it may be amended from time to time; or
            3.   Convicted of gross misdemeanor harm caused by a dog under M.S. § 609.226, subd. 1, as it may be amended from time to time.
         (b)   Any person who owns a dangerous or potentially dangerous dog and is found to be in violation of any of the provisions of this section or had owned a dangerous or potentially dangerous dog but never achieved compliance with this section may be prohibited from ownership or custody of another dog for a period of five years after the original declaration. Any dog found to be in violation, may be impounded until due process is completed, pursuant to division (K)(10) of this section.
         (c)   If any member of a household is prohibited from owning a dog in division (K)(13)(a) or (b), unless specifically approved with or without restrictions by the city, no person in the household is permitted to own a dog.
      (14)   Dog ownership prohibition review. Beginning three years after a conviction under division (K)(13)(a) of this section that prohibits a person from owning a dog, and annually thereafter, the person may request in writing to the Police Chief that the city review the prohibition. The city may consider such facts as the seriousness of the violation or violations that led to the prohibition, any criminal convictions, or other facts that the city deems appropriate. The city may rescind the prohibition entirely or rescind it with limitations. The city also may establish conditions a person must meet before the prohibition is rescinded, including, but not limited to, successfully completing dog training or dog handling courses. If the city rescinds a person's prohibition and the person subsequently fails to comply with any limitations imposed by the city or the person is convicted of any animal violation involving unprovoked bites or dog attacks, the city may permanently prohibit the person from owning a dog in this state.
      (15)   Penalties.
         (a)   Unless stated otherwise, any person who violates a provision of this section is guilty of a misdemeanor.
         (b)   Any person who is convicted of a second or subsequent violation of any provision of division (K)(4), (5) or (6) of this section is guilty of a gross misdemeanor.
         (c)   Any person who violates division (K)(13) of this section, whether an owner or household member, is guilty of a gross misdemeanor.
   (L)   Dangerous animals (excluding dogs).
      (1)   Attack by an animal.  It shall be unlawful for any person's animal to inflict or attempt to inflict bodily injury to any person or other animal whether or not the owner is present. This section shall not apply to dogs as regulated by division (K) of this section.
      (2)   Destruction of dangerous animal.  The Animal Control Officer shall have the authority to order the destruction of dangerous animals in accordance with the terms established by this chapter.
      (3)   Definitions.  For the purpose of this division, the following definitions shall apply unless the context clearly indicates or requires a different meaning.
         (a)   DANGEROUS ANIMAL.  An animal which has:
            1.   Caused bodily injury or disfigurement to any person on public or private property;
            2.   Engaged in any attack on any person under circumstances which would indicate danger to personal safety;
            3.   Exhibited unusually aggressive behavior, such as an attack on another animal;
            4.   Bitten one or more persons on two or more occasions; or
            5.   Been found to be potentially dangerous and/or the owner has personal knowledge of the same, the animal aggressively bites, attacks, or endangers the safety of humans or domestic animals.
         (b)   POTENTIALLY DANGEROUS ANIMAL.  An animal which has:
            1.   Bitten a human or a domestic animal on public or private property;
            2.   When unprovoked, chased or approached a person upon the streets, sidewalks, or any public property in an apparent attitude of attack; or
            3.   Has engaged in unprovoked attacks causing injury or otherwise threatening the safety of humans or domestic animals.
         (c)   PROPER ENCLOSURE.  Securely confined indoors or in a securely locked pen or structure suitable to prevent the animal from escaping and to provide protection for the animal from the elements. A proper enclosure does not include a porch, patio, or any part of a house, garage, or other structure that would allow the animal to exit of its own volition, or any house or structure in which windows are open or in which door or window screens are the only barriers which prevent the animal from exiting. The enclosure shall not allow the egress of the animal in any manner without human assistance. A pen or kennel shall meet the following minimum specifications:
            1.   Have a minimum overall floor size of 32 square feet.
            2.   Sidewalls shall have a minimum height of five feet and be constructed of 11-gauge or heavier wire. Openings in the wire shall not exceed two inches, support posts shall be 1¼-inch or larger steel pipe buried in the ground 18 inches or more. When a concrete floor is not provided, the sidewalls shall be buried a minimum of 18 inches in the ground.
            3.   A cover over the entire pen or kennel shall be provided. The cover shall be constructed of the same gauge wire or heavier as the sidewalls and shall also have no openings in the wire greater than two inches.
            4.   An entrance/exit gate shall be provided and be constructed of the same material as the sidewalls and shall also have no openings in the wire greater than two inches. The gate shall be equipped with a device capable of being locked and shall be locked at all times when the animal is in the pen or kennel.
         (d)   UNPROVOKED. The condition in which the animal is not purposely excited, stimulated, agitated or disturbed.
      (4)   Designation as potentially dangerous animal. The Animal Control Officer shall designate any animal as a potentially dangerous animal upon receiving evidence that the potentially dangerous animal has, when unprovoked, then bitten, attacked, or threatened the safety of a person or a domestic animal as stated in division (C)(2). When an animal is declared potentially dangerous, the Animal Control Officer shall cause one owner of the potentially dangerous animal to be notified in writing that the animal is potentially dangerous.
      (5)   Evidence justifying designation. The Animal Control Officer shall have the authority to designate any animal as a dangerous animal upon receiving evidence of the following:
         (a)   That the animal has, when unprovoked, bitten, attacked, or threatened the safety of a person or domestic animal as stated in division (L)(3)(a) of this section.
         (b)   That the animal has been declared potentially dangerous and the animal has then bitten, attacked, or threatened the safety of a person or domestic animal as stated in division (L)(3)(a) of this section.
      (6)   Authority to order destruction. The Animal Control Officer, upon finding that an animal is dangerous hereunder, is authorized to order, as part of the disposition of the case, that the animal be destroyed based on a written order containing one or more of the following findings of fact:
         (a)   The animal is dangerous as demonstrated by a vicious attack, an unprovoked attack, an attack without warning or multiple attacks; or
         (b)   The owner of the animal has demonstrated an inability or unwillingness to control the animal in order to prevent injury to persons or other animals.
      (7)   Procedure. The Animal Control Officer, after having determined that an animal is dangerous, may proceed in the following manner: The Animal Control Officer shall cause one owner of the animal to be notified in writing or in person that the animal is dangerous and may order the animal seized or make orders as deemed proper. This owner shall be notified as to dates, times, places and parties bitten, and shall be given 14 days to appeal this order by requesting a hearing before the City Council for a review of this determination.
         (a)   If no appeal is filed, the Animal Control Officer shall obtain an order or warrant authorizing the seizure and the destruction of the animal from a court of competent jurisdiction, unless the animal is already in custody or the owner consents to the seizure and destruction of the animal.
         (b)   If an owner requests a hearing for determination as to the dangerous nature of the animal, the hearing shall be held before the City Council, which shall set a date for hearing not more than three weeks after demand for the hearing. The records of the Animal Control or City Clerk’s office shall be admissible for consideration by the Animal Control Officer without further foundation. After considering all evidence pertaining to the temperament of the animal, the City Council shall make an order as it deems proper. The City Council may order that the Animal Control Officer take the animal into custody for destruction, if the animal is not currently in custody. If the animal is ordered into custody for destruction, the owner shall immediately make the animal available to the Animal Control Officer.  If the owner does not immediately make the animal available, the Animal Control Officer shall obtain an order or warrant authorizing the seizure and the destruction of the animal from a court of competent jurisdiction.
         (c)   No person  shall harbor an animal after it has been found by to be dangerous and ordered into custody for destruction.
      (8)   Stopping an attack. If any police officer or Animal Control Officer is witness to an attack by an animal upon a person or another animal, the officer may take whatever means the officer deems appropriate to bring the attack to an end and prevent further injury to the victim.
      (9)   Notification of new address. The owner of an animal which has been identified as dangerous or potentially dangerous shall notify the Animal Control Officer in writing if the animal is to be relocated from its current address or given or sold to another person. The notification shall be given in writing at least 14 days prior to the relocation or transfer of ownership. The notification shall include the current owner’s name and address, the relocation address, and the name of the new owner, if any.
      (10)   Dangerous animal requirements.
         (a)   Requirements. If the City Council does not order the destruction of an animal that has been declared dangerous, the City Council may, as an alternative, order any or all of the following:
            1.   That the owner provide and maintain a proper enclosure for the dangerous animal as specified in division (L)(3)(c) of this section;
            2.   Post the front and the rear of the premises with clearly visible warning signs, including a warning symbol to inform children, that there is a dangerous animal on the property;
            3.   Provide and show proof annually of public liability insurance in the minimum amount of $300,000;
            4.   If the animal is outside the proper enclosure, the animal must be muzzled (if physically possible depending on the type of animal) and restrained by a substantial chain or leash (not to exceed six feet in length) and under the physical restraint of a person 16 years of age or older. The muzzle must be of a design as to prevent the animal from biting any person or animal, but will not cause injury to the animal or interfere with its vision or respiration;
            5.   The animal shall have a microchip implant as provided by M.S. § 347.515, as it may be amended from time to time;
            6.   All animals deemed dangerous by the Animal Control Officer shall be registered with the county in which this city is located within 14 days after the date the animal was so deemed and provide satisfactory proof thereof to the Animal Control Officer.
            7.   If the animal is a cat or ferret, it must be up to date with rabies vaccination.
         (b)   Seizure. As authorized by M.S. § 347.54, as it may be amended from time to time, the Animal Control Officer shall immediately seize any dangerous animal if the owner does not meet each of the above requirements within 14 days after the date notice is sent to the owner that the animal is dangerous. Seizure may be appealed to district court by serving a summons and petition upon the city and filing it with the district court.
         (c)   Reclaiming animals. A dangerous animal seized under division (L)(10)(b) of this section,  may be reclaimed by the owner of the animal upon payment of impounding and boarding fees and presenting proof to animal control that each of the requirements under division (L)(1)(a) of this section, is fulfilled. An animal not reclaimed under this section within 14 days may be disposed of as provided under division (L)(6) of this section, and the owner is liable to the city for costs incurred in confining and impounding the animal.
         (d)   Subsequent offenses. If an owner of an animal has subsequently violated the provisions under this division (K) with the same animal, the animal must be seized by animal control. The owner may request a hearing as defined in division (K)(7) of this section. If the owner is found to have violated the provisions for which the animal was seized, the Animal Control Officer shall order the animal destroyed in a proper and humane manner and the owner shall pay the costs of confining the animal. If the person is found not to have violated the provisions for which the animal was seized, the owner may reclaim the animal under the provisions of division (K)(1)(c) of this section. If the animal is not yet reclaimed by the owner within 14 days after the date the owner is notified that the animal may be reclaimed, the animal may be disposed of as provided under division (K)(6) of this section and the owner is liable to the animal control for the costs incurred in confining, impounding and disposing of the animal.
   (M)   Basic care.
      (1)   All animals shall receive from their owners or keepers kind treatment, housing in the winter, and sufficient food and water for their comfort. Any person not treating their pet in a humane manner will be subject to the penalties provided in this section.
      (2)   Dogs and cats. Dogs and cats must be provided the following basic care.
         (a)   Food. Dogs and cats must be provided with food of sufficient quantity and quality to allow for normal growth or the maintenance of body weight. Feed standards shall be those recommended by the National Research Council.
         (b)   Water. Dogs and cats must be provided with clean, potable water in sufficient quantity to satisfy the animal’s needs or supplied by free choice. Snow or ice is not an adequate water source.
         (c)   Transportation and shipment. When dogs or cats are transported in crates or containers, the crates or containers must be constructed of nonabrasive wire or a smooth, durable material suitable for the animals. Crates and containers must be clean, adequately ventilated, contain sufficient space to allow the animals to turn around, and provide maximum safety and protection to the animals. Exercise for 20 to 30 minutes and water must be provided at least once every eight hours. Food must be provided at least once every 24 hours or more often, if necessary, to maintain the health and condition of the animals.
         (d)   Shelter size. A confinement area must provide sufficient space to allow each animal to turn about freely and to easily stand, sit, and lie in a normal position. Each confined animal must be provided a minimum square footage of floor space as measured from the tip of its nose to the base of its tail, plus 25%, expressed in square feet. The formula for computing minimum square footage is: (length of animal plus 25%) times (length of animal plus 25%), divided by 144. A shaded area must be provided sufficient to protect the animal from the direct rays of the sun at all times during the months of May to October.
         (e)   Exercise. All dogs and cats must be provided the opportunity for periodic exercise, either through free choice or through a forced work program, unless exercise is restricted by a licensed veterinarian.
         (f)   Group housing and breeding. Animals housed together must be kept in compatible groups. Animals must not be bred so often as to endanger their health.
         (g)   Temperature. Confinement areas must be maintained at a temperature suitable for the animal involved.
         (h)   Ventilation. An indoor confinement area must be ventilated. Drafts, odors, and moisture condensation must be minimized. Auxiliary ventilation, such as exhaust fans, vents, and air conditioning, must be used when the ambient temperature rises to a level that may endanger the health of the animal.
         (i)   Lighting. An indoor confinement area must have at least eight hours of illumination sufficient to permit routine inspection and cleaning.
         (j)   Confinement and exercise area surfaces. Where applicable, the interior surfaces of confinement and exercise areas, including crates or containers, must be constructed and maintained so that they are substantially impervious to moisture and may be readily cleaned. They must protect the animal from injury and be kept in good repair.
         (k)   Drainage. Where applicable, a suitable method must be used to rapidly eliminate excess fluids from confinement areas.
         (l)   Sanitation. Food and water receptacles must be accessible to each animal and located so as to minimize contamination by excreta. Feeding and water receptacles must be kept clean. Disposable food receptacles must be discarded when soiled. Measures must be taken to protect animals from being contaminated with water, wastes, and harmful chemicals. Wastes must be disposed of properly. Where applicable, flushing methods and a disinfectant must be used periodically. Bedding, if used, must be kept clean and dry. Outdoor enclosures must be kept clean and base material replaced as necessary.
      (3)   Birds, rodent other animals. Basic care provided to pet and companion animal birds, rodents and other shall be consistent with M.S. § 346.40, § 346.41 and § 346.42, as those statutes may be amended from time to time.
      (4)   Dogs and cats in motor vehicles.
         (a)   Unattended dogs or cats. A person may not leave a dog or a cat unattended in a standing or parked motor vehicle in a manner that endangers the dog’s or cat’s health or safety.
         (b)   Removal of dogs or cats. A peace officer, as defined in M.S. § 626.84, as it may be amended from time to time, a humane agent, a dog warden, or a volunteer or professional member of a fire or rescue department of the city may use reasonable force to enter a motor vehicle and remove a dog or cat which has been left in the vehicle in division (M)(4)(a) of this section. A person removing a dog or a cat under this division shall use reasonable means to contact the owner of the dog or cat to arrange for its return home. If the person is unable to contact the owner, the person may take the dog or cat to an animal shelter.
      (5)   Dog houses. A person in charge or control of any dog which is kept outdoors or in an unheated enclosure shall provide the dog with shelter and bedding as prescribed in this section as a minimum.
         (a)   Building specifications. The shelter shall include a moisture proof and windproof structure of suitable size to accommodate the dog and allow retention of body heat. It shall be made of durable material with a solid, moisture proof floor or a floor raised at least two inches from the ground. Between November 1 and March 31 the structure must have a windbreak at the entrance. The structure shall be provided with a sufficient quantity of suitable bedding material consisting of hay, straw, cedar shavings, blankets, or the equivalent, to provide insulation and protection against cold and dampness and promote retention of body heat.
         (b)   Shade. Shade from the direct rays of the sun, during the months of May to October shall be provided.
         (c)   Farm dogs. In lieu of the requirements of division (M)(5)(a) and (b) of this section, a dog kept on a farm may be provided with access to a barn with a sufficient quantity of loose hay or bedding to protect against cold and dampness.
   (N)   Breeding moratorium.  Every female dog or female cat in heat shall be confined in a building or other enclosure in a manner that it cannot come in contact with another dog or cat except for planned breeding.  Upon capture and failure to reclaim the animal, every dog or cat shall be neutered or spayed prior to being transferred to a new owner.
   (O)   Enforcing officer.  The Council is hereby authorized to appoint an animal control officer(s) to enforce the provisions of this section. In the officer’s duty of enforcing the provisions of this division (O), he or she may from time to time, with the consent of the City Council, designate assistants.
   (P)   Pound.  Every year the Council shall designate an official pound to which animals found in violation of this chapter shall be taken for safe treatment, and if necessary, for destruction.
   (Q)   Interference with officers. No person shall in any manner molest, hinder, or interfere with any person authorized by the City Council to capture dogs, cats or other animals and convey them to the pound while engaged in that operation.  Nor shall any unauthorized person break open the pound, or attempt to do so, or take or attempt to take from any agent any animal taken up by him or her in compliance with this chapter, or in any other manner to interfere with or hinder the officer in the discharge of his or her duties under this chapter.
   (R)   Fighting animals.
      (1) The provisions of M.S. § 343.31, as it may be amended from time to time, are adopted herein by reference.
      (2)   No person shall:
         (a)   Promote, engage in, or be employed in the activity of cockfighting, dogfighting, or violent pitting of one pet or companion animal as defined in M.S. § 346.36, subd. 6, as it may be amended from time to time, against another of the same or a different kind;
         (b)   Receive money for the admission of a person to a place used, or about to be used, for that activity;
         (c)   Willfully permit a person to enter or use for that activity premises of which the permitter is the owner, agent, or occupant;
         (d)   Use, train, or possess a dog or other animal for the purpose of participating in, engaging in, or promoting that activity; or
         (e)   Purchase a ticket of admission or otherwise gain admission to the activity of cockfighting, dogfighting, or violent pitting of one pet or companion animal against another of the same or a different kind.
   (S)   Feeding stray cats and dogs.
      (1)   Definitions.
         (a)   FEED or FEEDING means the placing of dog or cat food, or similar food products or consumable materials attractive to dogs and cats, which may result in dogs and cats congregating thereon on a regular basis, placed on the ground, in an obviously intended feeder, or in a feeder at a height accessible to cats and dogs.
         (b)   STRAY means an unlicensed domestic or feral dog or cat running at large and unaccompanied or controlled by an owner.
      (2)   Policy and purpose. High populations of stray dogs and cats pose a hazard to human health and safety, as such animals provide a fruitful breeding ground for infectious disease, including but not limited to rabies and distemper, and may otherwise bite or attack humans and domestic animals. In addition, food provided for stray animals is often attractive to wild animals such as raccoons and rodents and may create nuisance conditions such as a rat harborage or other wild animal infestation.
      (3)   Feeding strays. No person shall feed or allow the feeding of any stray cat or dog within the city.
      (4)   Exceptions. Veterinarians and persons who, acting within the scope of their employment with any governmental entity non-profit, or humane society has custody of or manages stray dogs and cats are not subject to the prohibitions of this section.