§ 90.42  ANIMALS THAT HAVE BITTEN PERSONS.
   (A)   Any dog, cat or other domesticated animals which have bitten or otherwise injured any person so as to cause an abrasion of the skin shall be immediately taken, impounded and kept separated from other dogs, cats or other domesticated animals for ten days. If, during that period, such dog, cat or other domesticated animal develops symptoms of illness, a veterinarian shall be called to diagnose its condition. If the symptoms disclosed are such as to indicate the presence of rabies, such dog, cat or other domesticated animal shall be destroyed, in such a manner, however, as to preserve intact the head, which shall thereupon be detached and immediately sent to the diagnostic laboratory of the Department of Agriculture. In case such dog, cat or other domesticated animal cannot be safely taken up and impounded, it may be shot, care being taken to preserve the head intact which shall thereupon be immediately detached and be delivered to the diagnostic laboratory of the Department of Agriculture.
   (B)   If, at the expiration of the period of ten days, no symptoms of rabies have been developed in such dog, cat or other domesticated animal so impounded, the same may be redeemed by the owner upon payment of the redemption fees and charges specified under § 90.40 of this chapter; provided, however, that, in case any dog, cat or other domesticated animal so impounded for biting a person shall have previously bitten any person, such dog, cat or other domesticated animal shall be humanely destroyed by the poundkeeper. After having been notified that his or her dog, cat or other domesticated animal has bitten or otherwise injured any person, the owner or keeper thereof shall not, under any circumstances, permit such animal to be at large unless securely muzzled.
(1999 Code, § 90.37)  (Ord. 770, passed 9-15-1975)