§ 155.08  STANDARDS FOR REVIEW OF APPLICATIONS FOR CERTIFICATES OF APPROPRIATENESS.
   (A)   Standards for review of replacement structures, new construction, additions and alterations. In considering an application for a certificate of appropriateness for replacement structures, new construction, additions and alterations, the Commission shall consider only the following general standards, specific design guidelines, if any, accompanying the ordinance designating the landmark, interior landmark or district, and the standards included in this section, as relevant and applicable.
      (1)   Height. Height shall be visually compatible with properties, structures, sites, public ways, objects, and places to which it is visibly related.
      (2)   Proportion of front facade. The relationship of the width to the height of the front elevation shall be visually compatible with properties, structures, sites, public ways, objects and places to which it is visually related.
      (3)   Proportion of openings. The relationship of the width to height of windows and doors shall be visually compatible with properties, structures, sites, public ways, objects and places to which the building is visually related.
      (4)   Rhythm of solids to voids in front facades. The relationship of solids to voids in the front facade of a structure shall be visually compatible with properties, structures, sites, public ways, objects and places to which it is visually related.
      (5)   Rhythm of spacing and structures on streets. The relationship of a structure or object to the open space between it and adjoining structures or objects shall be visually compatible with the properties, structures, sites, public ways, objects and places to which it is visually related.
      (6)   Rhythm of entrance porches, storefront recesses and other projections. The relationship of entrances and other projections to sidewalks shall be visually compatible with the properties, structures, sites, public ways, objects and places to which it is visually related.
      (7)   Relationship of materials and texture. The relationship of the materials and texture of the facade shall be visually compatible with the predominant materials used in the structures to which it is visually related.
      (8)   Roof shapes. The roof shape of a structure shall be visually compatible with the structures to which it is visually related.
      (9)   Walls of continuity. Facades and property and site structures, such as masonry walls, fences and landscape masses, shall, when it is a characteristic of the area, form cohesive walls of enclosure along a street, to ensure visual compatibility with the properties, structures, sites, public ways, objects and places to which such elements are visually related.
      (10)   Scale of a structure. The size and mass of structures in relation to open spaces, windows, door openings, porches, adjacent structures and balconies shall be visually compatible with the properties, structures, sites, public ways, objects and places to which they are visually related.
      (11)   Directional expression of front elevation. A structure shall be visually compatible with the properties, structures, sites, public ways, objects and places to which it is visually related in its directional character, whether this be vertical character, horizontal character or nondirectional character.
      (12)   Preserving distinguishing features. The distinguishing original qualities or character of a property, structure, site or object and its environment shall not be destroyed or adversely affected in a material way. The alteration of any historic material or distinctive architectural features should be avoided when possible.
      (13)   Protection of resources. Every reasonable effort shall be made to protect and preserve archaeological and natural resources affected by, or adjacent to any project.
      (14)   New construction. In considering new construction, the Commission shall not impose a requirement for the use of a single architectural style or period, though it may impose a requirement for consistency with the chosen style.
      (15)   Repair to deteriorated features. Deteriorated architectural features shall be repaired rather than replaced, wherever possible, in accordance with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties. In the event replacement is necessary, the new material need not be identical to but should match the material being replaced in composition, design, color, texture and other visual qualities. Repair or replacement of missing architectural features should be based on accurate duplications of features, substantiated by historic, physical or pictorial evidence rather than on conjectural designs or the availability of different architectural elements from other buildings or structures.
      (16)   Surface cleaning. The surface cleaning of historic material and distinctive architectural features shall be undertaken with the gentlest means possible. Sandblasting and other cleaning methods that will damage the historically, visually, aesthetically, culturally or archaeologically significant materials shall not be undertaken.
      (17)   Reversibility of additions and alterations. Wherever possible, additions or alterations to historic properties shall be done in such manner that if such additions or alterations were to be removed in the future, the essential form and integrity of the historic property would not be impaired.
   (B)   Standards for review of demolitions. In considering an application for a certificate of appropriateness for demolition, the Commission shall consider only the following general standards, the Secretary of Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation of Historic Properties, as amended, and the standards included in division (A) above:
      (1)   Whether the property, structure or object is of such historic, cultural, architectural or archaeological significance that its demolition would be detrimental to the public interest and contrary to the general welfare of the people of the city and the state;
      (2)   Whether the property, structure or object contributes to the distinctive historic, cultural, architectural or archeological character of the district as a whole and should be preserved for the benefit of the people of the city and the state;
      (3)   Whether demolition of the property, structure or object would be contrary to the purpose and intent of this chapter and to the objectives of the historic preservation for the applicable district;
      (4)   Whether the property, structure or object is of such old, unusual or uncommon design, texture, and/or material that it could not be reproduced without great difficulty and/or expense; and
      (5)   Except in cases where the owner has no plans for a period of up to five years to replace an existing landmark or property, structure or object in a district, no certificate of appropriateness shall be issued until plans for a replacement structure or object have been reviewed and approved by the Commission.
   (C)   Building scale. The maximum allowable square footage, in accordance with § 150.148 of the city code, may be limited if the City Historic Preservation Commission finds that the proposed residence or addition(s) violate the city historic preservation chapter. In addition, for any addition, alteration or construction that satisfies the standards of this section, but does not conform with the building scale limitations in the city code, the Commission may recommend that the Council grant relief from the building scale limitations of the city code, based on the standards for variances from the building scale regulations as set forth in the city code from time to time. Should such relief be required, any certificate of appropriateness shall be subject to the granting of such relief by the Council.
(Prior Code, § 51-7)  (Ord. 2012-03, passed 2-6-2012)