1187.10 DESIGN REVIEW STANDARDS/DEMOLITION CRITERIA.
   (a)   These guidelines are meant to give architects and property owners design direction consistent with Chapter 1187 of the Codified Ordinances of the City of Ashtabula. In principle, the board adopts the United States of America, Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties (Appendix A).
   (b)   Preservation/rehabilitation. With respect to preservation/rehabilitation generally it is the interest of the board that buildings within historic districts be preserved, thus maintaining the character of the district. Consistent with the United States Secretary of the Interior, Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties, the intent of these guidelines is to preserve and restore the features which establish a building's architectural character while making alterations and renovations necessary for the efficient and contemporary use of the building. The rehabilitation process assumes that some alterations  may be necessary to meet the needs of the building owner and the health, safety, and welfare of the building occupants. Such alterations should be done so as not to destroy the materials and features which help to define a building's historic, cultural, and/or architectural character.
   (c)   The historic materials, features, and/or craftsmanship are important in defining the building character and should be retained, protected, and repaired when possible. When the preservation of architectural features is not possible, alterations should be done in a manner respecHhl of the existing character, but done in a manner that is representative of architectural design and construction of contemporary times.
   (d)   Additions/new constructions. With respect to additions/new construction to existing buildings and all new buildings or structures within historic districts, it is generally the interest of the board that such additions/new construction shall be designed to enhance the character of the district. New buildings and additions should be representative of architectural design and construction of contemporary times.
   (e)   Additions to existing buildings in a historic district should be designed  so as not to detract from the original character of the building. Whenever possible, additions should be located away from primary or street face of the building. The addition should be designed so as not to destroy existing architectural features, such that the addition can be removed and the building restored to its original condition.
   (f)   New buildings in a historic district shall be designated to be compatible with the other structures in the district while still reflecting work of contemporary times. Proximity of existing buildings to the new building will affect the latitude in design constraints. An infill design should be more consistent with adjoining buildings than a freestanding structure.
   (g)   Demolition. With respect to demolition, it is the interest of the board that landmark buildings and buildings within historic districts be preserved and renovated for economically productive uses. The board encourages the saving and adaptive reuse of buildings significant to the character of the historic districts and the history of the City of Ashtabula. Consistent with this intent, the board also realizes that the historic district is not a static environment, but an  ever changing and developing entity. Applications for demolition shall be reviewed based on the overall impact the demolition will have on adjacent historic landmarks, historic districts, and the community.
   (h)   In reviewing an application, the AHPC will also consider the impact of the proposed use of the site on the historic district. Demolition of existing buildings which are not a significant loss to a historic district to allow for the construction of new development which enhances the historic district may be acceptable.
Appendix A
Secretary of the Interior's Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties
Standards for Preservation
l.    A property will be used as it was historically. or be given a new use that maximizes the retention of distinctive materials, features, spaces, and spatial relationships. Where a treatment and use have not been identified, a property will be protected and, if necessary, stabilized until additional work may be undertaken.
2.   The historic character of a property will be retained and preserved. The replacement of intact or repairable historic materials or alteration of features, spaces, and spatial relationships that characterize a property will be avoided.
3.   Each property will be recognized as a physical record of its time, place, and use. Work needed to stabilize, consolidate, and conserve existing historic materials and features will be physically and visually compatible, identifiable upon close inspection, and properly documented for future research.
4   Changes to a property that have acquired historic significance in their own right will be retained and preserved.
5.   Distinctive materials, features, finishes, and construction techniques or examples of craftsmanship that characterize a property will be preserved.
6.   The existing condition of historic features will be evaluated to determine the appropriate level of intervention needed. Where the severity of deterioration requires repair or limited replacement of a distinctive feature, the new material will match the old in composition, design, color, and texture.
7.   Chemical or physical treatments, if appropriate, will be undertaken using the gentlest means possible. Treatments that cause damage to historic materials will not be used.
8.   Archeological resources will be protected and preserved in place. If such resources must be disturbed, mitigation measures will be undertaken. http://ww,v.nps.gov/tps/standards/four-treatments/treatment-preservation.htm
Standards for Rehabilitation
1.   A property will be used as it was historically or be given a new use that requires minimal change to its distinctive materials, features, spaces, and spatial relationships.
2.   The historic character of a property will be retained and preserved. The removal of distinctive materials or alteration of features, spaces. and spatial relationships that characterize a property will be avoided.
3.   Each property will be recognized as a physical record of its time, place, and use. Changes that create a false sense of historical development, such as adding conjectural features or elements from other historic properties, will not be undertaken.
4.   Changes to a property that have acquired historic significance in their own right will be retained and preserved.
5.   Distinctive materials, features, finishes, and construction techniques or examples of craftsmanship that characterize a property will be preserved.
6.   Deteriorated  historic features will be repaired rather than replaced. Where the severity of deterioration requires replacement of a distinctive feature, the new feature will match the old in design, color, texture, and, where possible, materials. Replacement  of missing features will be substantiated by documentary and physical evidence.
7.   Chemical or physical treatments, if appropriate, will be undertaken using the gentlest means possible. Treatments that cause damage to historic materials will not be used.
8.   Archeological resources will be protected and preserved in place. If such resources must be disturbed, mitigation measures will be undertaken.
9.   New additions, exterior alterations, or related new construction will not destroy historic materials, features, and spatial relationships that characterize the property. The new work will be differentiated from the old and will be compatible with the historic materials, features, size, scale and proportion, and massing to protect the integrity of the property and its environment.
10.   New additions and adjacent or related new construction will be undertaken in such a manner that, if removed in the future, the essential form and integrity of the historic property and its environment would be unimpaired.  http://www.nps.gov/tps/standards/four-treatments/treatment-rehabilitation.htm
Standards for Restoration
1.   A property will be used as it was historically or be given a new use which reflects the property's restoration period.
2.   Materials and features from the restoration period will be retained and preserved. The removal of materials or alteration of features, spaces, and spatial relationships that characterize the period will not be undertaken.
3.   Each property will be recognized as a physical record of its time, place, and use. Work needed to stabilize, consolidate and conserve materials and features from the restoration period will be physically and visually compatible, identifiable upon close inspection, and properly documented for future research.
4.   Materials, features, spaces, and finishes that characterize other historical periods will be documented prior to their alteration or removal.
5.   Distinctive materials, features, finishes, and construction techniques or examples of craftsmanship that characterize the restoration period will be preserved.
6.   Deteriorated features from the restoration period will be repaired rather than replaced. Where the severity of deterioration requires replacement of a distinctive feature, the new feature will match the old in design, color, texture, and, where possible, materials.
7.   Replacement of missing features from the restoration period will be substantiated by documentary and physical evidence. A false sense of history will not be created by adding conjectural features, features from other properties, or by combining features that never existed together historically.
8.   Chemical or physical treatments, if appropriate, will be undertaken using the gentlest means possible. Treatments that cause damage to historic materials will not be used.
9.   Archeological resources affected by a project will be protected and preserved in place.  If such resources must be disturbed, mitigation measures will be undertaken.
10.   Designs that were never executed historically will not be constructed.  http://www.nps.gov/tps/standards/four-treatments/treatment-reconstruction.htm
Standards for Reconstruction
1.   Reconstruction will be used to depict vanished or non-surviving portions of a property when documentary and physical evidence is available to permit accurate reconstruction with minimal conjecture, and such reconstruction is essential to the public understanding of the property.
2.   Reconstruction of a landscape, building, structure, or object in its historic location will be preceded by a thorough archeological investigation to identify and evaluate those features and artifacts which are essential to an accurate reconstruction. If such resources must be disturbed, mitigation measures will be undertaken.
3.   Reconstruction will include measures to preserve any remaining historic materials, features, and spatial relationships.
4.   Reconstruction will be based on the accurate duplication of historic features and elements substantiated by documentary or physical evidence rather than on conjectural designs or the availability of different features from other historic properties. A reconstructed property will re-create the appearance of the non-surviving historic property in materials, design, color, and texture.
5.   A reconstruction will be clearly identified as a contemporary recreation.
6.   Designs that were never executed historically will not be constructed. http://www.tps.gov/tps/standards/four-treatments/treatment-reconstruction.htm
   (Ord.  2019-91.  Passed 8-5-19.)