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Montgomery County Overview
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Montgomery County Zoning Ordinance (2014)
COMCOR - Code of Montgomery County Regulations
COMCOR Code of Montgomery County Regulations
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CHAPTER 1. GENERAL PROVISIONS - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 1A. STRUCTURE OF COUNTY GOVERNMENT - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 2. ADMINISTRATION - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 2B. AGRICULTURAL LAND PRESERVATION - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 3. AIR QUALITY CONTROL - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 3A. ALARMS - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 5. ANIMAL CONTROL - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 8. BUILDINGS - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 8A. CABLE COMMUNICATIONS - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 10B. COMMON OWNERSHIP COMMUNITIES - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 11. CONSUMER PROTECTION - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 11A. CONDOMINIUMS - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 11B. CONTRACTS AND PROCUREMENT - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 13. DETENTION CENTERS AND REHABILITATION FACILITIES - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 15. EATING AND DRINKING ESTABLISHMENTS - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 16. ELECTIONS - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 17. ELECTRICITY - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 18A. ENERGY POLICY - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 19. EROSION, SEDIMENT CONTROL AND STORMWATER MANAGEMENT - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 19A. ETHICS - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 20 FINANCE - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 21 FIRE AND RESCUE SERVICES - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 22. FIRE SAFETY CODE - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 22A. FOREST CONSERVATION - TREES - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 23A. GROUP HOMES - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 24. HEALTH AND SANITATION - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 24A. HISTORIC RESOURCES PRESERVATION - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 24B. HOMEOWNERS’ ASSOCIATIONS - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 25. HOSPITALS, SANITARIUMS, NURSING AND CARE HOMES - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 25A. HOUSING, MODERATELY PRICED - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 25B. HOUSING POLICY - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 26. HOUSING AND BUILDING MAINTENANCE STANDARDS - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 27. HUMAN RIGHTS AND CIVIL LIBERTIES - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 27A. INDIVIDUAL WATER SUPPLY AND SEWAGE DISPOSAL FACILITIES - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 29. LANDLORD-TENANT RELATIONS - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 30. LICENSING AND REGULATIONS GENERALLY - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 30C. MOTOR VEHICLE TOWING AND IMMOBILIZATION ON PRIVATE PROPERTY - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 31. MOTOR VEHICLES AND TRAFFIC - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 31A. MOTOR VEHICLE REPAIR AND TOWING REGISTRATION - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 31B. NOISE CONTROL - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 31C. NEW HOME WARRANTY AND BUILDER LICENSING - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 33. PERSONNEL AND HUMAN RESOURCES - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 33B. PESTICIDES - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 35. POLICE - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 36. POND SAFETY - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 38A. RADIO, TELEVISION AND ELECTRICAL APPLIANCE INSTALLATION AND REPAIRS - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 40. REAL PROPERTY - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 41. RECREATION AND RECREATION FACILITIES - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 41A. RENTAL ASSISTANCE - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 42A. RIDESHARING AND TRANSPORTATION MANAGEMENT - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 44. SCHOOLS AND CAMPS - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 44A. SECONDHAND PERSONAL PROPERTY - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 45. SEWERS, SEWAGE DISPOSAL AND DRAINAGE - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 47. VENDORS - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 48. SOLID WASTES - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 49. STREETS AND ROADS - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 50. SUBDIVISION OF LAND - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 51 SWIMMING POOLS - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 51A. TANNING FACILITIES - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 52. TAXATION - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 53. TAXICABS - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 53A. TENANT DISPLACEMENT - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 54. TRANSIENT LODGING FACILITIES - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 55. TREE CANOPY - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 56. URBAN RENEWAL AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 56A. VIDEO GAMES - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 57. WEAPONS - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 59. ZONING - REGULATIONS
CHAPTER 60. SILVER SPRING, BETHESDA, WHEATON AND MONTGOMERY HILLS PARKING LOT DISTRICTS - REGULATIONS
MISCELLANEOUS MONTGOMERY COUNTY REGULATIONS
TABLE 1 Previous COMCOR Number to Current COMCOR Number
TABLE 2 Executive Regulation Number to Current COMCOR Number
TABLE 3 Executive Order Number to Current COMCOR Number
INDEX BY AGENCY
INDEX BY SUBJECT
County Attorney Opinions and Advice of Counsel
Sec. 25B-1. Legislative findings.
   (a)   The County Executive and County Council adopted on October 20, 1981, Joint Resolution No. 9-1503, "A Housing Policy for Montgomery County, Maryland in the 1980's."  That policy made certain findings which are incorporated by reference herein.
   (b)   The need for housing in the County for moderate- and low-income households has become more severe since 1973, when Chapter 25A, "Housing, Moderately Priced," was adopted.  Even though the private sector, the County government, the Housing Opportunities Commission, and nonprofit sponsors of housing projects have made substantial progress in financing and constructing affordable homes, and in the full use of federal and state programs, there remains a severe shortage of homes that are within the means of families of low and moderate incomes. Given economic trends and conditions projected through the year 2000, land and construction costs, inflation, diminished federal tax incentives, and high interest rates will increase rents to a level that will cause the problem to intensify, particularly for newly formed households, older people, handicapped individuals, those living in substandard housing, those subject to discrimination, and those with low or moderate incomes.  These trends and conditions, if unabated, will frustrate the County's goal of a full range of housing choices, conveniently located throughout the County.  The County should devote special attention to the provision of assisted-family housing and identify actions that the County may take to provide or stimulate production of additional units of assisted-family housing.
   (c)   Rising costs, when combined with the changes in the size and age of households in the County, compel a higher priority than has heretofore been given on planning for, zoning for, and constructing a larger proportion of smaller, less costly and more energy efficient homes located in more compactly formed communities and, where possible, capable of being served by public or shared transportation.  Where feasible, energy and transportation conservation can be better advanced by mixed use development which closely relates housing, employment and other activities in well-planned communities.
   (d)   Notwithstanding the clear evidence of this present and future need, there is concern among the public over the effect on established neighborhoods, communities and services of any increase in the densities and supply of housing. However, these community concerns can be addressed in a variety of ways. Smaller, energy-efficient homes can be attractively designed and developed to be compatible with their environment from the perspectives of density, appearance and use of services and facilities, so long as reasonable standards are followed.  Well-designed elderly housing, low- and moderate-income housing and group homes can enrich the overall quality of community life, making it possible for people to remain in their home community throughout the entire cycle of life.  Similarly, the elimination of unlawful discrimination in housing has the effect of enriching community life while promoting broader opportunities and better personal relations.
   (e)   Wide distribution of affordable, including assisted-family, housing throughout the County is a desirable objective of public policy in order to provide for a balance of housing choices in any one community to avoid over concentration of assisted-family housing in any community, and because communities that are racially, ethnically, chronologically, and economically heterogeneous are preferable to those which do not reflect the broad diversity of people who live in the County.
   (f)   The County has well-developed processes for determining the need for facilities and amenities.  These processes, which provide for extensive public participation, include the capital improvements program process, the master plan and sector plan processes, zoning, the development approval process, including subdivision regulation, adequate public facilities ordinance, growth policy, site plan review, and special exception and variance procedures.  Nevertheless, stimulating public advocacy and participation in the development of affordable and assisted-family housing can have a beneficial effect on public understanding and support for such housing. (1982 L.M.C., ch. 45, § 1; 1993 L.M.C., ch. 37, § 1; 2004 L.M.C., ch. 2, § 2.)