§ 93.01  DEFINITIONS; LEGALITY OF ITEMS.
   (A)   As used in KRS 227.700 to 227.750, FIREWORKS means any composition or device for the purpose of producing a visible or an audible effect by combustion, deflagration, or detonation, and which meets the definition of “consumer fireworks”as defined in division (B) or “display” fireworks as defined in division (D) and as set forth in the U.S. Department of Transportation's (DOT) hazardous materials regulations.
      (1)   Exception number 1:  Toy pistols, toy canes, toy guns, or other devices in which paper or plastic caps manufactured in accordance with DOT regulations, and packed and shipped according to said regulations, are not considered to be fireworks and shall be allowed to be used and sold at all times.
      (2)   Exception number 2:  Model rockets and model rocket motors designed, sold, and used for the purpose of propelling recoverable aero models are not considered to be fireworks.
      (3)   Exception number 3:  Propelling or expelling charges consisting of a mixture of sulfur, charcoal, and saltpeter are not considered as being designed for producing audible effects.
(KRS 227.700)
   (B)   As used in KRS 227.700 through 227.750, COMMON FIREWORKS means fireworks that are suitable for use by the public, designed primarily to produce visible effects by combustion, and comply with the construction, chemical composition, and labeling regulations of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. The types, sizes, and amount of pyrotechnic contents of these devices are limited as enumerated in this chapter.  Some small devices designed to produce audible effects are included, such as whistling devices, ground devices containing 50 milligrams or less of explosive composition, and aerial devices containing 130 milligrams or less of explosive composition. CONSUMER FIREWORKS are further defined by the Consumer Product Safety Commission in CPSC, 16 CPSC, 16 C.F.R. Pts 1500 and 1507, are classified as division 1.4 explosives by the U.S. Department of Transportation and include the following:
      (1)   Ground and hand-held sparkling devices.
         (a)   Dipped stick-sparkler or wire sparkler.  These devices consist a metal wire or wood dowel that has been coated with pyrotechnic composition.  Upon ignition of the tip of the device, a shower of sparks is produced.  Sparklers may contain up to 100 grams of pyrotechnic composition per item.  Those devices containing any perchlorate or chlorate salts may not exceed five grams of pyrotechnic composition per item.  Wire sparklers which contain no magnesium and which contain less than 100 grams of composition per item are not included in this category, in accordance with DOT regulations.
         (b)   Cylindrical fountain.  Cylindrical tube containing not more than 75 grams of pyrotechnic composition.  Upon ignition, a shower of colored sparks, and sometimes a whistling effect or smoke, is produced.  This device may be provided with a spike for insertion into the ground (spike fountain), a wood or plastic base for placing on the ground (base fountain), or a wood or cardboard handle, if intended to be hand-held (handle fountain). When more than one tube is mounted on a common base, total pyrotechnic composition may not exceed 200 grams, or 500 grams if the tubes are separated from each other on the base by a distance of at least 1/2 inch.
         (c)   Cone fountain.  Cardboard or heavy paper cone containing up to 50 grams of pyrotechnic composition.  The effect is the same as that of a cylindrical fountain. When more than one cone is mounted on a common base, the total pyrotechnic composition may not exceed 200 grams, or 500 grams of the tubes are separated from each other on the base by a distance of at least 1/2 inch.
         (d)   Illuminating torch.  Cylindrical tube containing up to 100 grams of pyrotechnic composition.  Upon ignition, colored fire is produced.  May be spike, base, or hand-held. When more than one tube is mounted on a common base, the total pyrotechnic composition may not exceed 200 grams, or 500 grams if the tubes are separated from each other on the base by a distance of at least 1/2 inch.
         (e)   Wheel.  A device attached to a post or tree by means of a nail or string.  A wheel may have one or more drivers, each of which may contain not more than 60 grams of pyrotechnic composition.  No wheel contain more than 200 grams total pyrotechnic composition.  Upon ignition, the wheel revolves, producing a shower of color and sparks and, sometimes, a whistling effect.
         (f)   Ground spinner.  Small device containing not more than 20 grams of pyrotechnic composition, similar in operation to a wheel but intended to be placed on the ground and ignited.  A shower of sparks and color is produced by the rapidly spinning device.
         (g)   Flitter sparkler.  Narrow paper tube attached to a stick or wire and filled with not more than 100 grams of pyrotechnic composition that produces color and sparks upon ignition. The paper at one end of the tube is ignited to make the device function.
         (h)   Toy smoke device.  Small plastic or paper item containing not more than 100 grams of pyrotechnic composition that, upon ignition, produces white or colored smoke as the primary effect.
      (2)   Aerial devices.
         (a)   Sky rockets and bottle rockets.  Cylindrical tube containing not more than 20 grams of pyrotechnic composition.  Sky rockets contain a wooden stick for guidance and stability and rise into the air upon ignition.  A burst of color or noise or both is produced at the height of flight.
         (b)   Missile-type rocket.  A device similar to a sky rocket in size, composition, and effect that uses fins rather than a stick for guidance and stability.
         (c)   Helicopter, aerial spinner.  A tube containing up to 20 grams of pyrotechnic composition.  A propeller or blade is attached, which, upon ignition, lifts the rapidly spinning device into the air.  A visible or audible effect is produced at the height of flight.
         (d)   Roman candles.  Heavy paper or cardboard tube containing up to 20 grams of pyrotechnic composition.  Upon ignition, up to ten stars (pellets of pressed pyrotechnic composition that burn with bright color) are individually expelled at several second intervals.
         (e)   Mine, shell.  Heavy cardboard or paper tube usually attached to a wood or plastic base and containing up to 60 grams of total chemical composition (lift charge, burst charge, and visible or audible effect composition).  Upon ignition, “stars,” components producing reports containing up to 130 milligrams of explosive composition per report, or other devices are propelled into the air.  The term “mine” refers to a device with no internal components containing a bursting charge, and the term “shell” refers to a device that propels a component that subsequently bursts open in the air.  A mine or shell device may contain more than one tube provided the tubes fire in sequence upon ignition of one external fuse.  The term “cake” refers to a dense-packed collection of mine or shell tubes. Total chemical composition including lift charges of any multiple tube devices may not exceed 200 grams. The maximum quantity of lift charge in any one tube of a mine or shell device shall not exceed 20 grams, and the maximum quality of break or bursting charge in any component shall not exceed 25% of the total weight of chemical composition in the component.
         (f)   Aerial shell kit, reloadable tube.  A package kit containing a cardboard, high- density polyethylene (HDPE, or equivalent launching tube with multiple-shot aerial shells. Each aerial shell is limited to a maximum of 60 grams of total chemical composition (lift charge, bust charge, and visible or audible effect composition), and the maximum diameter of each shell shall not exceed 1 3/4 inches. In addition, the maximum quantity of lift charge in any shell shall not exceed 20 grams, and the maximum quantity of break or bursting charge in any shell shall not exceed 25% of the total weight of chemical composition in the shell.  The total chemical composition of all the shells in the kit, including lift charge, shall not exceed 400 grams.  The user lower a shell into the launching tube, at the time of firing, with the fusing extending out of the top of the tube.  After the firing, the tube is then reloaded with another shell for the next firing.  All launching tubes shall be capable of firing twice the number of shells in the kit without failure of the tube.  Each package of multiple-shot aerial shells must comply with all warning label requirements of the Consumer Product Safety Commission.
      (3)   Audible ground devices.
         (a)   Firecrackers, salutes.  Small paper-wrapped or cardboard tube containing not more than 50 milligrams of pyrotechnic composition.  Those used in aerial devices may contain not more than 130 milligrams of explosive composition per report.  Upon ignition, noise and a flash of light is produced.
         (b)   Chaser.  Small paper or cardboard tube that travels along the ground upon ignition.  A whistling effect, or other noise, is often produced.  The explosive composition used to create the noise may not exceed 50 milligrams.
(KRS 227.702)
   (C)   Items listed below are classified as NOVELTIES and TRICKNOISEMAKERS and are not classified as consumer fireworks by the U.S. Department of Transportation and their transportation, storage, retail sale, possession, sale, and use shall be allowed throughout the state at all times.
      (1)   Snake, glow worm.  Pressed pellet of pyrotechnic composition that produces a large, snake-like ash upon burning.  The ash expands in length as the pellet burns.  These devices may not contain mercuric thiocyanate.
      (2)   Smoke device.  Tube or sphere containing pyrotechnic composition that, upon ignition, produces white or colored smoke as the primary effect.
      (3)   Wire sparkler.  Wire coated with pyrotechnic composition that produces a shower of sparks upon ignition.  These items may not contain magnesium and must not exceed 100 grams of composition per item.  Devices containing any chlorate or perchlorate salts may not exceed five grams of composition per item.
      (4)   Trick noisemaker.  Item that produces a small report intended to surprise the user.  These devices include:
         (a)   Party popper.  Small plastic or paper item containing not more than 16 milligrams of explosive composition that is friction sensitive.  A string protruding from the device is pulled to ignite it, expelling paper streamers and producing a small report.
         (b)   Booby trap. Small tube with string protruding from both ends, similar to a party popper in design.  The ends of the string are pulled to ignite the friction sensitive composition, producing a small report.
         (c)   Snapper. Small, paper-wrapped item containing a minute quantity of explosive composition coated on small bits of sand.  When dropped, the device explodes producing a small report.
         (d)   Trick match. Kitchen or book match that has been coated with a small quantity of explosive or pyrotechnic composition.  Upon ignition of the match a small report or a shower of sparks is produced.
         (e)   Cigarette load. Small wooden peg that has been coated with a small quantity of explosive composition.  Upon ignition of a cigarette containing one of the pegs, a small report is produced.
         (f)   Auto burglar alarm. Tube which contains pyrotechnic composition that produces a loud whistle or smoke, or both, when ignited.  A small quantity of explosive, not exceeding 50 milligrams may also be used to produce a small report.  A squib is used to ignite the device.
(KRS 227.704)
   (D)   As used in KRS 227.700 through 227.750, DISPLAY FIREWORKS means pyrotechnic devices or large fireworks designed primarily to produce visible or audible effects by combustion, deflagration or detonation.  This term includes, but is not limited to, firecrackers containing more than two grains (130 milligrams) of explosive composition, aerial shells containing more than 40 grams of pyrotechnic composition, and other display pieces which exceed the limits for classification as consumer fireworks.  Display fireworks are defined by the Consumer Product Safety Commission in CPSC, 16 C.F.R. Pts. 1500 and 1507, and are classified as class B explosives by the U.S. Department of Transportation.
(KRS 227.706)
   (E)   Legality of items.
      (1)   Items described in division (B)(1) above are legal for retail sale provided all applicable federal and state requirements with respect thereto are met.
      (2)   Items described in divisions (B)(2), (B)(3), and (D) are not legal for retail sale but are legal under permits granted pursuant to this chapter for the purposes specified in this chapter for public displays and may be sold at wholesale as provided in this chapter.
      (3)   Items described in division (C) are legal for retail sale provided all applicable federal and state requirements with respect thereto are met.
(KRS 227.708)
   (F)   Age requirement.  No person or business shall give, offer for sale, or sell any consumer fireworks listed in KRS 227.702 to any person under eighteen (18) years of age. 
(227.715)