§ 151.285  GENERAL.
   (A)   General. The GW, Gateway Zoning District regulations implement Chapter 12 of the County Regional Framework Plan, entitled “Gateway Economic Development Plan”. The GW, Gateway Zoning District regulations provide a development option which landowners within the Route 173/I-94 interchange area may pursue as an alternative to the regulations provided elsewhere in this chapter. Property owners seeking to zone property to the GW, Gateway Zoning District and to develop properties within the GW, Gateway Zoning District shall be required to:
      (1)   Generally maintain consistency with the Conceptual Land Use Map;
      (2)   Utilize public sanitary sewer disposal and appropriate water supply as approved by the Lake County Public Works Department to service the development; and
      (3)   Use the planned unit development method as provided in § 151.051 for developing properties.
   (B)   Uses and development standards.  The following uses and development standards shall be applicable within the GW, Gateway Zoning District.
      (1)   Office/research uses and development standards.
         (a)   Principal uses. Offices, as defined in § 151.270(E)(2) and research uses (referring to the conduct of research in various fields of science, such as but not limited to chemistry, pharmaceuticals, medicine, electricity, computer sciences, transportation, and engineering);
         (b)   Accessory uses.  Those uses listed in § 151.270(E)(2)(b), those retail, sales and service uses that serve only the principal use, and pilot plants or test production facilities that serve only the principal use.
         (c)   Prohibited uses.  Heavy manufacturing (referring to basic processing and manufacturing of materials or products predominantly from raw material with the potential for significant external effects to the community and environment), light assembly (referring to processing, compounding, assembling, and packaging finished or semi-finished products in a manner which produces little or no external effects), and warehouse uses.
         (d)   Maximum floor area ratio (FAR): 0.40.
         (e)   Maximum impervious surface ratio (ISR): 0.60.
         (f)   Maximum building height: 50 feet.
         (g)   Minimum lot size: 80,000 square feet.
         (h)   Minimum lot width: 190 feet.
         (i)   Building setbacks:
            1.   Street - 50 feet;
            2.   Interior side - 30 feet; and
            3.   Rear - 30 feet.
      (2)   Office/light assembly uses and development standards.
         (a)   Principal uses.  Offices as defined in § 151.270(E)(2), research uses (referring to the conduct of research, development and testing in various fields of science, such as but not limited to chemistry, pharmaceuticals, medicine, electricity, computer sciences, transportation, and engineering, and including pilot plants or limited test production facilities) and light assembly uses (referring to processing, compounding, assembling, and packaging finished or semi-finished products in a manner that produces little external effects to the community or to the environment).
         (b)   Accessory uses.  Warehouse, wholesale, distribution, and retail sales and service uses that serve only the principal use; accessory uses shall occupy no more than 50% of the gross building area.
         (c)   Prohibited uses. Heavy manufacturing (referring to basic processing and manufacturing of materials or products predominantly from raw material with the potential for significant external effects to the community and environment) and motor freight terminals.
         (d)   Maximum floor area ratio (FAR): 0.40.
         (e)   Maximum impervious surface ratio (ISR): 0.60.
         (f)   Maximum building height: 50 feet.
         (g)   Minimum lot size: 80,000 square feet.
         (h)   Minimum lot width: 190 feet.
         (i)   Building setbacks:
            1.   Street - 35 feet;
            2.   Interior side - 20 feet; and
            3.   Rear - 25 feet.
      (3)   Retail/service uses and development standards.
         (a)   Principal uses.
            1.   All types of retail sales and service uses allowed (by right or by conditional use permit) under §§ 151.110 through 151.114 of this chapter.
            2.   Non-retail uses (specifically office, financial, clinic, or government) are limited to 25% of the ground floor area; these uses may occupy 100% of the upper floors.
         (b)   Maximum floor area ratio (FAR): 0.40.
         (c)   Maximum impervious surface ratio (ISR): 0.70.
         (d)   Maximum building height: 35 feet.
         (e)   Minimum lot size: 20,000 square feet.
         (f)   Minimum lot width: 100 feet.
         (g)   Building setbacks:
            1.   Street - 50 feet;
            2.   Interior side - 12 feet; and
            3.   Rear - 12 feet.
      (4)   Residential use and development standards.
         (a)   Principal uses. Single family detached dwellings.
         (b)   Accessory uses. Those uses accessory to single family detached dwellings allowed under §§ 151.110 through 151.114 of this chapter.
         (c)   Density: Maximum one-half dwelling unit per acre.
         (d)   Minimum lot size: 80,000 square feet.
         (e)   Minimum lot width: 190 feet.
         (f)   Building setbacks:
            1.   Street - 50 feet;
            2.   Interior side - 30 feet;
            3.   Rear - 50 feet; and
            4.   Accessory uses/structures - ten feet from all property lines.
         (g)   Maximum impervious surface ratio (ISR): 0.25.
         (h)   Maximum building height: 35 feet.
   (C)   Building and site design standards.
      (1)   Natural resources and open space.
      (2)   Protection. Natural resources shall be protected in accordance with the provisions of §§ 151.070 through 151.072 of this chapter. The resource protection areas shall remain as permanent open space.
 
COMMENTARY:
Each development should enhance existing natural resource areas and provide open space areas. In addition to natural open space areas, it may also be appropriate to provide formal open space, such as a village square or building courtyards, as a focal point of the development. All open space areas should feature amenities such as benches and walkways. Buildings should be oriented to take advantage of open space views and access.

 
      (3)   Stormwater management. Stormwater detention shall be provided to comply with the provisions of §§ 151.145 through 151.154 of this chapter.
 
COMMENTARY:
A unified stormwater management system should be designed for the entire development site. To the greatest extent possible, stormwater conveyance and storage should utilize the naturally occurring drainage patterns and wetlands. Detention basins with native wetland vegetation are encouraged; basins with hard, man-made edges are discouraged. Stormwater management facilities should comply with best management practices as provided in the Lake County Stormwater Management Commission’s
Technical Reference Manual.
 
COMMENTARY:
The stormwater management system should be integrated into the open space and pedestrian circulation plan. Incorporation of fountains to create water features is encouraged. Buildings should be oriented to take advantage of views of attractive water features and wetlands.

 
   (4)   Access and circulation.
         (a)   Automobile access and circulation.  Automobile access and circulation shall be designed to meet the requirements of the highway authority having jurisdiction.
            1.   The primary access roads shall be designed as boulevards for a distance of at least 200 yards from the intersections with Route 173. The central median shall be planted with a variety of deciduous and evergreen plantings to ensure year-round foliage. Annuals shall be used to ensure maximum color during spring, summer, and fall.
            2.   Internal roadways shall be designed to allow circulation between various buildings and uses within the entire development without exiting onto Route 173. Roadways shall be designed to minimize conflicts between automobile and truck traffic.
            3.   An entrance monument shall be provided for both the north and south primary access roads. The entrance monuments shall be designed to complement the building architecture and shall be consistent with the signage and landscaping.
 
COMMENTARY:
Following are guidelines to be considered in designing automobile access:
   a.
   The northeast quadrant as defined in Chapter 12 of the Lake County Regional Framework Plan may have a new access point to Route 173, approximately centered between the existing Mill Creek Road and I-94. The northeast quadrant may have one primary access point onto Mill Creek Road and a secondary access point primarily intended to serve truck traffic to the area designated on the Conceptual Land Use Map for office/light assembly/warehouse uses.

   b.
   The southeast quadrant as defined in Chapter 12 of the Lake County Regional Framework Plan may have a new access point onto Route 173 directly parallel to the northeast quadrant access point. The southeast quadrant may also have one primary access point onto Mill Creek Road. A secondary access point for truck traffic may also be permitted.
 
         (b)   Pedestrian circulation.  Walking paths shall be provided within and between various uses contained within the overall development through the provision of sidewalks along internal roadways and/or footpaths through the open space areas. The sidewalk and footpath network shall be designed to provide for future possible connections to adjacent developments.
      (5)   Building design. Building design standards, including building massing, shall be consistent with the architectural standards provided in § 151.171. The following architectural guidelines for buildings are intended to require development that is compatible in scale and appearance with the character of the Route 173 Interchange area.
 
COMMENTARY:
A uniform design pallet of building materials, colors, and architectural design should be applied throughout the entire subject area. Building elements and other uses, such as vehicle parking, that are incompatible with the surrounding character, should be strictly screened from view from adjacent properties and roadways, including I-94. Architectural plans should also incorporate green building design. These guidelines are not all-inclusive; it may be necessary to address additional design elements during the review of individual project proposals.

         1.   
Building Facades
            All building facades that are visible from adjacent major roadways should be designed to be aesthetically pleasing. This includes the side and rear facades of buildings that are visible from Route 173, I-94, and US 41. Aesthetically pleasing design can be accomplished by employing the same design elements to the side and rear facades that are often only given to front facades.

         2.   
Building Massing
            Big box architecture is discouraged. Large wall expanses (whether long or tall) should be eliminated through vertical and horizontal articulation (changes so the wall is not a straight horizontal or vertical line) and the use of architectural projections, such as porticos, and recesses. Large wall expanses can also be broken through the use of pilasters, columns, canopies, and windows. Changes in building heights and rooflines can also be utilized to often the visual impacts of long building walls. Changes in facade materials and colors can improve the appearance of large buildings, but, alone these changes are not sufficient to eliminate the visual impacts of large wall expanses.

 
         3.   Building Height
            Building heights should gradually transition from low buildings to tall buildings. Where necessary, this transition can occur within a single building by designing the building with a larger, single-story base and a taller (multi-story or high-ceilinged warehouse) center.

         4.   
Building Entrances and Windows
            Building entrances should allow for easy access from parking areas and public open space. Primary building entrances should be easily identifiable through the use of design elements such as canopies, porticos, recesses, or archways. Buildings doors and windows should be pedestrian scaled.

            In addition to providing natural lighting for occupants, windows should be utilized to soften building appearances, displaying merchandise, and inviting customers into buildings. Windows should be appropriately sized, arranged, and designed to enhance the overall appearance of the building. Multi-paned windows, windows with a vertical orientation, and windows with a well defined frame or sill are preferred.



         5.
   Facade Materials and Colors
            In order to complement the character of the Route 173 interchange area, the use of natural building materials and colors is encouraged. Desirable building materials include brick, terra cotta, and natural stone, such as limestone and river stone. The exclusive use of synthetic materials, such as EIFS/Drivit, and pre-cast concrete is discouraged.
 


            Building colors should be natural, earth tones. Dark tones should be utilized at building base and lighter tones for upper levels. The color selection for architectural elements such as roofs, awnings, cornices, eaves, and sills should complement the main building color.

         6.   
Roof Styles and Materials
            Roof styles can add visual interest to all buildings, but should remain consistent with the overall building design. Buildings should be designed with a fascia and cornices that provide a transition between the wall and roof. Arched and pitched roofs and roof features such as dormers and cupolas are encouraged. Flat rooflines are discouraged unless part of a green roof design.

 



         7.   
Mechanical and service area screening
            All rooftop mechanical equipment should be visually screened from sight from all public access areas and adjacent properties and roadways. Ground level mechanical equipment, trash collection, and loading areas should be appropriately screened from view from all public access areas and adjacent properties and roadways.
 
      (6)   Lighting standards.  Lighting shall comply with the provisions of §§ 151.165 through 151.173 of this chapter. Lighting shall ensure the safety and security of building occupants and customers. A uniform lighting plan shall be designed for the entire area. Lighting shall be designed and scaled to create an attractive, friendly pedestrian environment. Pathways shall be lit with low bollard lights. All light fixtures shall be shielded. All lighting shall be designed to minimize glare on adjacent properties.
      (7)   Parking. Parking spaces shall be provided for each building in accordance with the off-street parking standards contained in §§ 151.165 through 151.173 of this chapter. Parking shall not be allowed in the required street setbacks unless otherwise approved as part of the conditional use permit. Parking areas shall comply with the parking lot landscaping requirements of §§ 151.165 through 151.173.
 
COMMENTARY:
Parking lots should be located to the side and rear of buildings, when possible. Shared parking is encouraged. Parking lots should provide well-defined walkways that minimize pedestrian-vehicle conflicts. Consideration should be given to using semi-pervious paving and bio-swales to reduce stormwater runoff and improve water quality.

 
      (8)   Outdoor storage.  Outdoor storage of materials and equipment shall be prohibited. This storage shall occur within structures unless otherwise approved as part of the conditional use permit.
      (9)   Sign standards. Signs shall meet the standards provided in §§ 151.165 through 151.173 of this chapter, except freestanding signs shall be of a monument type not exceeding 12 feet in height. Pole signs shall be prohibited.
 
COMMENTARY:
      1.   
Sign Massing and Landscaping
         Freestanding signs shall emphasize horizontal rather than vertical massing. The base of the freestanding sign should be landscaped.

      2.   
Sign Composition
         Softer, subtler alternatives to prominent corporate logos should be used. For multi-tenant buildings and developments, consistent lettering, colors, and sign designs should be used on all wall signs and monument signs.
 


      The sign text should consist of no more than two fonts or sizes. Italicized, bold, and plain text should not be mixed. The use of images, pictures, and logos should be minimized but, if used, should be simplified in appearance and integrated into the site’s overall architectural and color schemes. Solid lettering is preferred over highlighted or accented lettering.

 
      3.   Sign Colors
         The sign and any background should together consist of no more than two colors or shades of the same color. The sign color scheme should match or complement the color scheme of the building. Primary, white and “day-glo” colors should be avoided.



      4.   
Sign Materials
         Plastic or glass surfaces that result in polished, glossy, shiny, or reflective sign surfaces should not be used. Wood stone, brick, masonry, or metal materials which produce matte, natural brushed, patina-like, or burnished surfaces should be used.

      5.   
Sign Lighting
         Natural (soft halogen or incandescent) lighting should be used. Over-bright or fluorescent lighting should be avoided. Internal illumination and protruding overhead lights or lamps should be avoided. Lighting devices should be hidden or integrated into architectural features or landscaping. Lighting should be focused and only so bright as to effectively illuminate the sign surface. For mounted letters, back-lighting should be used.



         For freestanding signs, ground-based external lighting should be used. Ground-based light sources should be concealed within landscaping.
 
      (10)   Landscaping and screening.
         (a)   Landscaping and screening shall meet the standards provided in § 151.167 of this chapter.
         (b)   All development shall contain adequate exterior transition areas that are bermed and landscaped so as to preclude views of buildings, loading areas, truck parking lots, and other undesirable views from adjacent uses, properties, and roadways. For screening purposes, fences may be used in conjunction with berms and landscaping.
         (c)   Loading docks and truck parking areas shall be screened from view from all public (customer) access areas, including public access areas on the same property or development. In order to minimize undesirable views, loading docks and truck parking areas shall be located back-to-back between adjacent office, light assembly, and warehouse buildings.
 
COMMENTARY:
The following guidelines should be used to design landscaping. The guidelines are not all-inclusive; additional landscaping may be required based on new concerns or changing conditions.

      Desirable views of office and retail buildings should be preserved from adjacent roadways and properties with compatible uses. Partial views of well-designed office, light assembly, and warehouse building front facades as well as side and rear facades that achieve aesthetically pleasing 360-degree design, may be permissible from adjacent roadways and properties with compatible uses.

 
      The view of parking lots should be partially obscured or softened through landscaping, staggered landscaped berms, or preserved natural vegetation. Extensive area of mowed or manicured turf grass should be avoided.



      Existing woodlands should be preserved and enhanced. Trees should be planted in random clusters, rather than straight rows. Like species should be grouped only to maintain continuity. Formal landscaping should be limited to small areas. Landscape areas should incorporate a complementary mix of deciduous and evergreen species, while emphasizing deciduous species.
 
      Landscaping should cluster varieties of species sizes (canopies interspersed with understories, bushes, and groundcover), emphasize hardy native species (limit predominance of non-native or ornamental species), minimize the use of formal hedges and incorporate groundcover and/or bushes into landscaping, while limiting the predominance of groundcover and/or bushes.



      Landscaping should maximize seasonal colors by including perennial flowers and opportunities for planning annual flowers that bloom in spring, summer, and fall.

      Earthen berms should undulate naturally and have varying heights and setbacks. Berms should be landscaped with a variety of plant species, as otherwise required in these landscaping guidelines. Extensive areas of turf grass on berms should be avoided.

      At intersections, provide soft massings of landscaping to complement signage and to provide a focal point, while not impairing visibility of buildings nor impairing traffic safety. Bike and pedestrian pathways should be integrated into landscaping to soften visibility, separate from vehicle traffic, and promote safety.
 
      (11)   Noise.  All equipment shall operate in accordance with the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency’s nighttime noise regulations (Ill. Adm. Code, Title 35, Subtitle H, Chapter I). Compliance with the noise standards shall be measured at the boundary of the subject property.
      (12)   Development calculations.  It is the purpose of this provision to promote the improvement and expansion of I-94 in the county, increase the accessibility of I-94 to all residents of the county, reduce the public costs associated with the improvements, and reduce the congestion of the existing I-94 interchanges and associated roadways by allowing for increased building intensities at selected suitable locations in exchange for private assistance in providing the improvements. The projects may not be achievable in a timely fashion without the private sector participation.
         (a)   Eligibility.  Any land lying within GW, Gateway Zoning District containing area that is required for I-94 purposes by the Tollway Authority may use these provisions.
         (b)   Standards.  For properties abutting I-94 or its ramps, or containing area required by the Tollway Authority for the installation of new ramps to I-94 or approaches thereto or for widening of I-94, these provisions permit the floor area ratio, impervious surface ratio, and density to be increased in accordance with the following:
            1.   The maximum floor area ratio, impervious surface ratio, and density specified in this section may be calculated on the entire site prior to the contribution of land to the Tollway Authority.
            2.   The yard setbacks required by this section shall be measured from the original property lines as they existed prior to the contribution, provided no yard shall be reduced to less than 30 feet.
      (13)   Conceptual Land Use Map.  A Conceptual Land Use Map is included for the Gateway Economic Development Area. The map is intended for illustrative purposes. The most important feature of the map is the preservation of parcels immediately adjacent to the Route 173 and I-94 interchange for high-quality office/research development and the preservation of land along the Route 173 and U.S. 41 frontages for retail/services development. The interior portions of the planning area are designated for office/light assembly/warehouse uses. The residential use is restricted to the northwest quadrant, away from the interchange and major arterial streets. Property owners may submit planned unit development applications that vary from the Conceptual Land Use Map as long as they are consistent with the intent of the map and uses and development standards specified in subsection (B) of this section.
      (14)   Procedure for development.
         (a)   Planned unit development.  Property owners seeking to zone property to the GW, Gateway Zoning District or to develop properties within the GW, Gateway Zoning District shall be required to use the planned unit development procedure as provided in § 151.051 of this chapter for developing properties. Any modifications to an approved planned unit development shall be subject to the planned unit development modification provisions of § 151.051(D). Any change of use to a use of an equal or lesser intensity within the same use category under the provisions of subsection (B) above shall be allowed, provided all the use and development standards are met.
         (b)   Nonresidential development.  Nonresidential developments shall be subject to the provisions of §§ 151.070 through 151.072, site capacity, site plan review and natural resource protection standards. Any subdivision of land shall comply with the  subdivisions provisions of §§ 151.185 through 151.204.
         (c)   Residential development.  Residential developments shall be subject to the provisions of §§ 151.185 through 151.204, subdivisions and §§ 151.220 and 151.221, school and park contributions.
         (d)   Application review; approval.  All applications for rezoning, planned unit development, subdivision, building, or other development permits relating to any parcel within the Route 173/I-94 Interchange area as well as the review of the applications, shall be in accordance with the applicable plans, codes, ordinances, and regulations developed in accordance with the Route 173/I-94 Interchange intergovernmental agreement.
(Ord., § 15.1, passed 10-13-2009)