§ 51.051  DEFINITIONS.
   For the purpose of this subchapter, the following definitions shall apply unless the context clearly indicates or requires a different meaning.
   ALERT.
      (1)   The raw water supply (stream flow) is consistently below seasonal averages. If the raw water supply continues to decline, the supply may not adequately meet normal needs; or
      (2)   Due to mechanical failure or limitations of water treatment plant capacity, adequate water supplies cannot be maintained and their conditions may be sufficient to cause a water shortage.
   CRISIS.
      (1)   The raw water level is below the level necessary to meet normal needs; or
      (2)   Due to mechanical failure or limitations of water treatment plant capacity, a water shortage is subject to occur.
   CUSTOMER.  Any person using water for any purpose from the town water distribution system and for which a regular charge is made.
   EMERGENCY.
      (1)   The raw water supply is below the level necessary to meet normal needs and serious water shortages exist; or
      (2)   Due to mechanical failure or the limitations of water treatment plant capacity a prolonged water shortage is subject to occur.
   WASTE OF WATER.  Includes, but is not limited to, failure to repair a controllable leak of water due to defective plumbing.
   WATER.  Water available to the town for treatment, or any water introduced by the town into its distribution system.
   WATER SHORTAGE ADVISORY.  Conditions exist which indicate the potential for water supply shortages.
   WATER USE CLASSES.  Established as follows:
      (1)   CLASS 1: ESSENTIAL WATER USES.
         (a)   Domestic use:  Water necessary to sustain human life and the lives of domestic pets, and to maintain minimum standards of hygiene and sanitation;
         (b)   Health care facilities:  Patient care and rehabilitation; and
         (c)   Public use:  Fire fighting, health and public protection purposes, if specifically approved by health officials and/or the governing bodies of the health officials.
      (2)   CLASS 2: SOCIALLY OR ECONOMICALLY IMPORTANT USES OF WATER.
         (a)   All domestic uses other than those included in Classes 1 and 3.  Home water use, including kitchen, bathroom, and laundry use;
         (b)   Outdoor non-commercial watering (public or private):
            1.   Agricultural irrigation for the production of food and fiber or the maintenance of livestock;
            2.   Water by commercial nurseries at a minimum level necessary to maintain stock, to the extent that sources of water other than the town are not available or feasible to use;
            3.   Watering of golf course greens;
            4.   Use of water at a minimum rate necessary to implement re-vegetation following earth moving, where the vegetation is required pursuant to an erosion and sedimentation control plan adopted pursuant to law or regulation, to the extent that sources of water other than the town are not available or feasible to use; and
            5.   Water use by public gardens of nation, state, or regional significance where necessary to preserve specimens, to the extent that sources of water other than the town are not available or feasible to use.
         (c)   Filling and operation of swimming pools:
            1.   Pools used by health care facilities for patient care and rehabilitation; and
         (d)   Washing off motor vehicles: Commercial car and truck washes, unrestricted hours of operation;
         (e)   Commercial laundromats: Unrestricted hours of operation; and
         (f)   Restaurants, clubs, and eating establishments: Unrestricted hours of operation.
      (3)   CLASS 3: NON-ESSENTIAL USES OF WATER.
         (a)   Ornamental purposes: Fountains, reflecting pools, and artificial waterfalls;
         (b)   Outdoor non-commercial watering (public or private): Gardens, lawns, parks, golf courses, playing fields, and other recreational areas;
         (c)   Exceptions:
            1.   Agricultural irrigation for the production of food and fiber, or the maintenance of livestock;
            2.   Watering by commercial nurseries at a minimum level necessary to maintain stock, to the extent that sources of water other than the town are not available or feasible to use;
            3.   Water of golf greens; and
            4.   Certain testing and drills by the Fire Department, if in the interest of public safety and approved by the town.
         (d)   Flushing of sewers and hydrants: Exceptions: As needed to ensure public safety, and approved by health officials and the town.
(Prior Code, § 50.65)